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Childhood severe acute respiratory syndrome in Taiwan and how to differentiate it from childhood influenza infection.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004 Nov; 158(11):1037-42.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate clinical features and outcomes of children in Taiwan with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) vs those of children with influenza to differentiate the 2 diseases.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

Patients 20 years or younger with clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory evidence of SARS from March to July 2003 vs children with virus culture-confirmed influenza in a 1:1 age- and sex-matched control group.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Rates of symptoms, abnormal laboratory data, and outcomes of recovery, sequelae, or death.

RESULTS

The 15 SARS patients (9 girls and 6 boys) had a median age of 17 years (age range, 4-20 years). Nine patients (60%) were infected through household contact, 4 (27%) nosocomially, 1 (7%) through contact with a neighbor, and 1 (7%) after returning from Hong Kong. All 15 patients had fever, 3 (20%) had chills, and 11 (73%) had cough. Only 1 patient (7%) had sputum production; 1 (7%) had rhinorrhea. At presentation, 5 patients (33%) had leukopenia, 6 (40%) had lymphopenia, and 5 (33%) had monocytopenia. All children recovered without sequelae. Children with SARS had significantly lower incidences of rhinorrhea (odds ratio [OR], 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.00-0.09), sputum production (OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.63), and sore throat (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03-0.85) than children with influenza. Both groups had similar incidences of leukopenia or lymphopenia, but SARS patients had a significantly higher incidence of monocytopenia (33% vs 0%, P = .04).

CONCLUSIONS

Childhood SARS is usually not fatal. The absence of rhinorrhea and presence of monocytopenia in SARS may distinguish it from influenza.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Pediatric, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15520340

Citation

Chang, Luan-Yin, et al. "Childhood Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in Taiwan and How to Differentiate It From Childhood Influenza Infection." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 158, no. 11, 2004, pp. 1037-42.
Chang LY, Huang FY, Wu YC, et al. Childhood severe acute respiratory syndrome in Taiwan and how to differentiate it from childhood influenza infection. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004;158(11):1037-42.
Chang, L. Y., Huang, F. Y., Wu, Y. C., Su, I. J., Chiu, N. C., Chen, K. T., Wu, H. S., Lin, T. H., Peng, S. F., Kao, C. L., Lee, C. Y., & Huang, L. M. (2004). Childhood severe acute respiratory syndrome in Taiwan and how to differentiate it from childhood influenza infection. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 158(11), 1037-42.
Chang LY, et al. Childhood Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in Taiwan and How to Differentiate It From Childhood Influenza Infection. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004;158(11):1037-42. PubMed PMID: 15520340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood severe acute respiratory syndrome in Taiwan and how to differentiate it from childhood influenza infection. AU - Chang,Luan-Yin, AU - Huang,Fu-Yuan, AU - Wu,Yi-Chun, AU - Su,Ih-Jen, AU - Chiu,Nan-Chang, AU - Chen,Kow-Tong, AU - Wu,Ho-Sheng, AU - Lin,Ting-Hsiang, AU - Peng,Shinn-Forng, AU - Kao,Chuan-Liang, AU - Lee,Chin-Yun, AU - Huang,Li-Min, PY - 2004/11/3/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/11/3/entrez SP - 1037 EP - 42 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 158 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate clinical features and outcomes of children in Taiwan with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) vs those of children with influenza to differentiate the 2 diseases. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Patients 20 years or younger with clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory evidence of SARS from March to July 2003 vs children with virus culture-confirmed influenza in a 1:1 age- and sex-matched control group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of symptoms, abnormal laboratory data, and outcomes of recovery, sequelae, or death. RESULTS: The 15 SARS patients (9 girls and 6 boys) had a median age of 17 years (age range, 4-20 years). Nine patients (60%) were infected through household contact, 4 (27%) nosocomially, 1 (7%) through contact with a neighbor, and 1 (7%) after returning from Hong Kong. All 15 patients had fever, 3 (20%) had chills, and 11 (73%) had cough. Only 1 patient (7%) had sputum production; 1 (7%) had rhinorrhea. At presentation, 5 patients (33%) had leukopenia, 6 (40%) had lymphopenia, and 5 (33%) had monocytopenia. All children recovered without sequelae. Children with SARS had significantly lower incidences of rhinorrhea (odds ratio [OR], 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.00-0.09), sputum production (OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.63), and sore throat (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03-0.85) than children with influenza. Both groups had similar incidences of leukopenia or lymphopenia, but SARS patients had a significantly higher incidence of monocytopenia (33% vs 0%, P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Childhood SARS is usually not fatal. The absence of rhinorrhea and presence of monocytopenia in SARS may distinguish it from influenza. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15520340/Childhood_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_in_Taiwan_and_how_to_differentiate_it_from_childhood_influenza_infection_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpedi.158.11.1037 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -