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Dietary fat and fatty acids and risk of colorectal cancer in women.
Am J Epidemiol 2004; 160(10):1011-22AJ

Abstract

The authors examined the association of intakes of different types of fat and fatty acids with risk of colorectal cancer using data from the Women's Health Study, a randomized trial of low-dose aspirin and vitamin E carried out among 39,876 healthy US women aged >/=45 years. Among the 37,547 women eligible for the present study, 202 developed colorectal cancer during an average follow-up period of 8.7 years (1993-2003). Intakes of dietary fat and its food sources were assessed at baseline by food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. Total fat intake was not related to colorectal cancer risk, nor were intakes of the different types of fat and major fatty acids. However, the authors observed a positive association between intake of fried foods away from home and colorectal cancer risk (highest quintile vs. lowest: relative risk = 1.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.16; p for trend = 0.01). These prospective cohort data provide little support for an association between dietary fat and colorectal cancer risk. However, intake of fried foods and/or other factors related to their intake may be associated with colorectal cancer development. This finding warrants further examination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. jhlin@rics.bwh.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15522858

Citation

Lin, Jennifer, et al. "Dietary Fat and Fatty Acids and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Women." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 160, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1011-22.
Lin J, Zhang SM, Cook NR, et al. Dietary fat and fatty acids and risk of colorectal cancer in women. Am J Epidemiol. 2004;160(10):1011-22.
Lin, J., Zhang, S. M., Cook, N. R., Lee, I. M., & Buring, J. E. (2004). Dietary fat and fatty acids and risk of colorectal cancer in women. American Journal of Epidemiology, 160(10), pp. 1011-22.
Lin J, et al. Dietary Fat and Fatty Acids and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Women. Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Nov 15;160(10):1011-22. PubMed PMID: 15522858.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat and fatty acids and risk of colorectal cancer in women. AU - Lin,Jennifer, AU - Zhang,Shumin M, AU - Cook,Nancy R, AU - Lee,I-Min, AU - Buring,Julie E, PY - 2004/11/4/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/11/4/entrez SP - 1011 EP - 22 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 160 IS - 10 N2 - The authors examined the association of intakes of different types of fat and fatty acids with risk of colorectal cancer using data from the Women's Health Study, a randomized trial of low-dose aspirin and vitamin E carried out among 39,876 healthy US women aged >/=45 years. Among the 37,547 women eligible for the present study, 202 developed colorectal cancer during an average follow-up period of 8.7 years (1993-2003). Intakes of dietary fat and its food sources were assessed at baseline by food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. Total fat intake was not related to colorectal cancer risk, nor were intakes of the different types of fat and major fatty acids. However, the authors observed a positive association between intake of fried foods away from home and colorectal cancer risk (highest quintile vs. lowest: relative risk = 1.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.16; p for trend = 0.01). These prospective cohort data provide little support for an association between dietary fat and colorectal cancer risk. However, intake of fried foods and/or other factors related to their intake may be associated with colorectal cancer development. This finding warrants further examination. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15522858/Dietary_fat_and_fatty_acids_and_risk_of_colorectal_cancer_in_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwh319 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -