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Urinary isoflavonoid excretion is inversely associated with the ratio of protein to dietary fibre intake in young women.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Feb; 59(2):284-90.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the prevalence of excretion of urinary isoflavonoids in women and determine any relationships with accustomed macronutrient intake.

DESIGN

Volunteers in one of two 4-month studies. Study 1 was a randomised crossover study whereby subjects consumed a placebo or isoflavone supplement for 2 months and crossed over. Study 2 was a parallel design in which subjects consumed a placebo for 1 month and an isoflavone supplement for 3 months.

SETTING

All subjects were free-living, healthy volunteers.

SUBJECTS

A total of 25 (study 1, n=14; study 2, n=11) premenopausal women were recruited through advertisements.

INTERVENTIONS

Volunteers were supplemented for 2 months (study 1) or 3 months (study 2) with purified isoflavones (86 mg/day) derived from red clover. Urinary isoflavonoids were measured during the placebo and the second month of isoflavone treatment. Macronutrient intakes were determined from weighed food records.

RESULTS

During isoflavone supplementation, the concentration of urinary total isoflavonoids increased by 15-fold (P<0.0001), with 5.4-fold variation between individuals. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that 24% of this variation could be explained by an interaction between dietary fibre and protein (P=0.047), with a highly significant inverse association between total isoflavonoid concentration and the protein to fibre ratio (r=-0.51, P=0.009).

CONCLUSIONS

Supplementation with purified isoflavones results in an increase in urinary isoflavonoid excretion and part of the individual variation in response is associated with an interaction between intakes of protein and dietary fibre. Whether manipulation of these macronutrients could enhance efficacy of isoflavone supplements remains to be determined.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Unit, School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15523488

Citation

Blakesmith, S J., et al. "Urinary Isoflavonoid Excretion Is Inversely Associated With the Ratio of Protein to Dietary Fibre Intake in Young Women." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 2, 2005, pp. 284-90.
Blakesmith SJ, Lyons-Wall PM, Joannou GE, et al. Urinary isoflavonoid excretion is inversely associated with the ratio of protein to dietary fibre intake in young women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(2):284-90.
Blakesmith, S. J., Lyons-Wall, P. M., Joannou, G. E., Petocz, P., & Samman, S. (2005). Urinary isoflavonoid excretion is inversely associated with the ratio of protein to dietary fibre intake in young women. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(2), 284-90.
Blakesmith SJ, et al. Urinary Isoflavonoid Excretion Is Inversely Associated With the Ratio of Protein to Dietary Fibre Intake in Young Women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(2):284-90. PubMed PMID: 15523488.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urinary isoflavonoid excretion is inversely associated with the ratio of protein to dietary fibre intake in young women. AU - Blakesmith,S J, AU - Lyons-Wall,P M, AU - Joannou,G E, AU - Petocz,P, AU - Samman,S, PY - 2004/11/4/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2004/11/4/entrez SP - 284 EP - 90 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 59 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of excretion of urinary isoflavonoids in women and determine any relationships with accustomed macronutrient intake. DESIGN: Volunteers in one of two 4-month studies. Study 1 was a randomised crossover study whereby subjects consumed a placebo or isoflavone supplement for 2 months and crossed over. Study 2 was a parallel design in which subjects consumed a placebo for 1 month and an isoflavone supplement for 3 months. SETTING: All subjects were free-living, healthy volunteers. SUBJECTS: A total of 25 (study 1, n=14; study 2, n=11) premenopausal women were recruited through advertisements. INTERVENTIONS: Volunteers were supplemented for 2 months (study 1) or 3 months (study 2) with purified isoflavones (86 mg/day) derived from red clover. Urinary isoflavonoids were measured during the placebo and the second month of isoflavone treatment. Macronutrient intakes were determined from weighed food records. RESULTS: During isoflavone supplementation, the concentration of urinary total isoflavonoids increased by 15-fold (P<0.0001), with 5.4-fold variation between individuals. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that 24% of this variation could be explained by an interaction between dietary fibre and protein (P=0.047), with a highly significant inverse association between total isoflavonoid concentration and the protein to fibre ratio (r=-0.51, P=0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Supplementation with purified isoflavones results in an increase in urinary isoflavonoid excretion and part of the individual variation in response is associated with an interaction between intakes of protein and dietary fibre. Whether manipulation of these macronutrients could enhance efficacy of isoflavone supplements remains to be determined. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15523488/Urinary_isoflavonoid_excretion_is_inversely_associated_with_the_ratio_of_protein_to_dietary_fibre_intake_in_young_women_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602071 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -