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Acute hepatitis B among children and adolescents--United States, 1990-2002.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2004 Nov 05; 53(43):1015-8.MM

Abstract

Since the 1991 adoption of a comprehensive strategy to eliminate hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission in the United States, the incidence of acute hepatitis B cases has declined steadily. Declines have been greatest among children born after the 1991 recommendations for universal infant hepatitis B vaccination were implemented. In 1995, the elimination strategy was expanded to include routine vaccination of all adolescents aged 11-12 years and, in 1999, to include children aged < or =18 years who had not been vaccinated previously. To describe the epidemiology of acute hepatitis B in children and adolescents in the United States, CDC analyzed notifiable disease surveillance data collected during 1990-2002 and data collected during 2001-2002 through enhanced surveillance of reported cases of acute hepatitis B in children born after 1990. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that the rate of acute hepatitis B in children and adolescents decreased 89% during 1990-2002 and that racial disparities in hepatitis B incidence have narrowed. Many confirmed cases in persons born after 1990 occurred among international adoptees and other children born outside the United States. Continued implementation of the hepatitis B elimination strategy and accurate surveillance data to monitor the impact of vaccination are necessary to sustain the decline of acute hepatitis B among children.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15525899

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Acute Hepatitis B Among Children and adolescents--United States, 1990-2002." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 53, no. 43, 2004, pp. 1015-8.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Acute hepatitis B among children and adolescents--United States, 1990-2002. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2004;53(43):1015-8.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2004). Acute hepatitis B among children and adolescents--United States, 1990-2002. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 53(43), 1015-8.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Acute Hepatitis B Among Children and adolescents--United States, 1990-2002. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2004 Nov 5;53(43):1015-8. PubMed PMID: 15525899.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute hepatitis B among children and adolescents--United States, 1990-2002. A1 - ,, PY - 2004/11/5/pubmed PY - 2004/11/9/medline PY - 2004/11/5/entrez SP - 1015 EP - 8 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 53 IS - 43 N2 - Since the 1991 adoption of a comprehensive strategy to eliminate hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission in the United States, the incidence of acute hepatitis B cases has declined steadily. Declines have been greatest among children born after the 1991 recommendations for universal infant hepatitis B vaccination were implemented. In 1995, the elimination strategy was expanded to include routine vaccination of all adolescents aged 11-12 years and, in 1999, to include children aged < or =18 years who had not been vaccinated previously. To describe the epidemiology of acute hepatitis B in children and adolescents in the United States, CDC analyzed notifiable disease surveillance data collected during 1990-2002 and data collected during 2001-2002 through enhanced surveillance of reported cases of acute hepatitis B in children born after 1990. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that the rate of acute hepatitis B in children and adolescents decreased 89% during 1990-2002 and that racial disparities in hepatitis B incidence have narrowed. Many confirmed cases in persons born after 1990 occurred among international adoptees and other children born outside the United States. Continued implementation of the hepatitis B elimination strategy and accurate surveillance data to monitor the impact of vaccination are necessary to sustain the decline of acute hepatitis B among children. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15525899/Acute_hepatitis_B_among_children_and_adolescents__United_States_1990_2002_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5343a4.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -