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Neuromuscular disorders in severe acute respiratory syndrome.
Arch Neurol. 2004 Nov; 61(11):1669-73.AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To delineate and clarify neuromuscular disorders in patients with probable severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

DESIGN

Case series with follow-up ranging from 3 weeks to 2 months.

SETTING

National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei.

PATIENTS

We investigated 4 patients with SARS who had concomitant neuromuscular problems. A diagnosis of SARS was based on the demonstration of serum coronavirus antibodies. Clinical presentations, laboratory results, electrophysiologic findings, and follow-up conditions were determined.

RESULTS

Patients developed neuromuscular problems approximately 3 weeks after the onset of SARS. Two women experienced motor-predominant peripheral nerve disorders. A man developed myopathy and a third woman experienced neuropathy and myopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid obtained from 2 patients with neuropathy disclosed normal protein content and the absence of pleocytosis and SARS coronavirus antibodies. Both patients with myopathy had elevated serum creatine kinase levels. A rapid clinical and electrophysiologic improvement was evident during follow-up examinations, with a good prognosis.

CONCLUSIONS

The neuromuscular problems in patients with SARS are considered to be critical-illness polyneuropathy or myopathy, possibly coexistent. Further pathological and microbiological studies are necessary to determine the relationship between SARS coronavirus and neuromuscular problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15534177

Citation

Tsai, Li-Kai, et al. "Neuromuscular Disorders in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome." Archives of Neurology, vol. 61, no. 11, 2004, pp. 1669-73.
Tsai LK, Hsieh ST, Chao CC, et al. Neuromuscular disorders in severe acute respiratory syndrome. Arch Neurol. 2004;61(11):1669-73.
Tsai, L. K., Hsieh, S. T., Chao, C. C., Chen, Y. C., Lin, Y. H., Chang, S. C., & Chang, Y. C. (2004). Neuromuscular disorders in severe acute respiratory syndrome. Archives of Neurology, 61(11), 1669-73.
Tsai LK, et al. Neuromuscular Disorders in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Arch Neurol. 2004;61(11):1669-73. PubMed PMID: 15534177.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuromuscular disorders in severe acute respiratory syndrome. AU - Tsai,Li-Kai, AU - Hsieh,Sung-Tsang, AU - Chao,Chi-Chao, AU - Chen,Yee-Chun, AU - Lin,Yea-Huey, AU - Chang,Shan-Chwen, AU - Chang,Yang-Chyuan, PY - 2004/11/10/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/11/10/entrez SP - 1669 EP - 73 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch Neurol VL - 61 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To delineate and clarify neuromuscular disorders in patients with probable severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). DESIGN: Case series with follow-up ranging from 3 weeks to 2 months. SETTING: National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei. PATIENTS: We investigated 4 patients with SARS who had concomitant neuromuscular problems. A diagnosis of SARS was based on the demonstration of serum coronavirus antibodies. Clinical presentations, laboratory results, electrophysiologic findings, and follow-up conditions were determined. RESULTS: Patients developed neuromuscular problems approximately 3 weeks after the onset of SARS. Two women experienced motor-predominant peripheral nerve disorders. A man developed myopathy and a third woman experienced neuropathy and myopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid obtained from 2 patients with neuropathy disclosed normal protein content and the absence of pleocytosis and SARS coronavirus antibodies. Both patients with myopathy had elevated serum creatine kinase levels. A rapid clinical and electrophysiologic improvement was evident during follow-up examinations, with a good prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: The neuromuscular problems in patients with SARS are considered to be critical-illness polyneuropathy or myopathy, possibly coexistent. Further pathological and microbiological studies are necessary to determine the relationship between SARS coronavirus and neuromuscular problems. SN - 0003-9942 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15534177/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/10.1001/archneur.61.11.1669 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -