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Rickettsioses and the international traveler.
Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Nov 15; 39(10):1493-9.CI

Abstract

The rickettsioses--zoonotic bacterial infections transmitted to humans by arthropods--were for many years considered to be oddities in travel medicine. During the previous 2 decades, however, reports of >450 travel-associated cases have been published worldwide, the vast majority being murine typhus caused by Rickettsia typhi, Mediterranean spotted fever caused by Rickettsia conorii, African tick bite fever caused by Rickettsia africae, and scrub typhus caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Most patients present with a benign febrile illness accompanied by headache, myalgia, and cutaneous eruptions, but severe complications and fatalities are occasionally seen. Current microbiological tests include culture, polymerase chain reaction, and serological analysis, of which only the latter method is widely available. Tetracyclines are the drugs of first choice and should be prescribed whenever a case of rickettsiosis is suspected. Preventive measures rely on minimizing the risk of arthropod bites when traveling in areas of endemicity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Aker University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. mogens.jensenius@ioks.uio.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15546086

Citation

Jensenius, Mogens, et al. "Rickettsioses and the International Traveler." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 39, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1493-9.
Jensenius M, Fournier PE, Raoult D. Rickettsioses and the international traveler. Clin Infect Dis. 2004;39(10):1493-9.
Jensenius, M., Fournier, P. E., & Raoult, D. (2004). Rickettsioses and the international traveler. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 39(10), 1493-9.
Jensenius M, Fournier PE, Raoult D. Rickettsioses and the International Traveler. Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Nov 15;39(10):1493-9. PubMed PMID: 15546086.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rickettsioses and the international traveler. AU - Jensenius,Mogens, AU - Fournier,Pierre-Edouard, AU - Raoult,Didier, Y1 - 2004/10/22/ PY - 2004/06/25/received PY - 2004/07/14/accepted PY - 2004/11/17/pubmed PY - 2005/11/9/medline PY - 2004/11/17/entrez SP - 1493 EP - 9 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 39 IS - 10 N2 - The rickettsioses--zoonotic bacterial infections transmitted to humans by arthropods--were for many years considered to be oddities in travel medicine. During the previous 2 decades, however, reports of >450 travel-associated cases have been published worldwide, the vast majority being murine typhus caused by Rickettsia typhi, Mediterranean spotted fever caused by Rickettsia conorii, African tick bite fever caused by Rickettsia africae, and scrub typhus caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Most patients present with a benign febrile illness accompanied by headache, myalgia, and cutaneous eruptions, but severe complications and fatalities are occasionally seen. Current microbiological tests include culture, polymerase chain reaction, and serological analysis, of which only the latter method is widely available. Tetracyclines are the drugs of first choice and should be prescribed whenever a case of rickettsiosis is suspected. Preventive measures rely on minimizing the risk of arthropod bites when traveling in areas of endemicity. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15546086/Rickettsioses_and_the_international_traveler_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/425365 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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