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The health of Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: factor analysis of self-reported symptoms.
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec; 61(12):1014-20.OE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A recent report showed that Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War displayed a greater prevalence of a multitude of self-reported symptoms than a randomly sampled comparison group of military personnel who were eligible for deployment but were not deployed to the Gulf.

AIMS

To investigate whether the pattern, rather than frequency, of symptom reporting in these Australian Gulf War veterans differed from that of the comparison group personnel.

METHODS

Factor analysis was used to determine whether the co-occurrence of 62 symptoms in 1322 male Gulf War veterans can be explained by a number of underlying dimensions, called factors. The methodology was also applied to 1459 male comparison group subjects and the factor solutions of the two groups were compared.

RESULTS

For the Gulf War veterans, a three factor solution displayed replicability and construct validity. The three factors were labelled as psycho-physiological distress, somatic distress, and arthro-neuromuscular distress, and were broadly similar to those described in previous studies of Gulf War veterans. A concordant three factor solution was also found for the comparison group subjects, with strong convergence of the factor loadings and factor scores across the two groups being displayed.

CONCLUSION

Results did not display evidence of a unique pattern of self-reported symptoms among Gulf War veterans. Results also indicated that the differences between the groups lie in the degrees of expression of the three underlying factors, consistent with the well documented evidence of increased self-reported symptom prevalence in Gulf War veterans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Central and Eastern Clinical School, Monash University, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. andrew.forbes@med.monash.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15550608

Citation

Forbes, A B., et al. "The Health of Australian Veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: Factor Analysis of Self-reported Symptoms." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 61, no. 12, 2004, pp. 1014-20.
Forbes AB, McKenzie DP, Mackinnon AJ, et al. The health of Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: factor analysis of self-reported symptoms. Occup Environ Med. 2004;61(12):1014-20.
Forbes, A. B., McKenzie, D. P., Mackinnon, A. J., Kelsall, H. L., McFarlane, A. C., Ikin, J. F., Glass, D. C., & Sim, M. R. (2004). The health of Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: factor analysis of self-reported symptoms. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 61(12), 1014-20.
Forbes AB, et al. The Health of Australian Veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: Factor Analysis of Self-reported Symptoms. Occup Environ Med. 2004;61(12):1014-20. PubMed PMID: 15550608.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The health of Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: factor analysis of self-reported symptoms. AU - Forbes,A B, AU - McKenzie,D P, AU - Mackinnon,A J, AU - Kelsall,H L, AU - McFarlane,A C, AU - Ikin,J F, AU - Glass,D C, AU - Sim,M R, PY - 2004/11/20/pubmed PY - 2004/12/21/medline PY - 2004/11/20/entrez SP - 1014 EP - 20 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 61 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: A recent report showed that Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War displayed a greater prevalence of a multitude of self-reported symptoms than a randomly sampled comparison group of military personnel who were eligible for deployment but were not deployed to the Gulf. AIMS: To investigate whether the pattern, rather than frequency, of symptom reporting in these Australian Gulf War veterans differed from that of the comparison group personnel. METHODS: Factor analysis was used to determine whether the co-occurrence of 62 symptoms in 1322 male Gulf War veterans can be explained by a number of underlying dimensions, called factors. The methodology was also applied to 1459 male comparison group subjects and the factor solutions of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: For the Gulf War veterans, a three factor solution displayed replicability and construct validity. The three factors were labelled as psycho-physiological distress, somatic distress, and arthro-neuromuscular distress, and were broadly similar to those described in previous studies of Gulf War veterans. A concordant three factor solution was also found for the comparison group subjects, with strong convergence of the factor loadings and factor scores across the two groups being displayed. CONCLUSION: Results did not display evidence of a unique pattern of self-reported symptoms among Gulf War veterans. Results also indicated that the differences between the groups lie in the degrees of expression of the three underlying factors, consistent with the well documented evidence of increased self-reported symptom prevalence in Gulf War veterans. SN - 1470-7926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15550608/The_health_of_Australian_veterans_of_the_1991_Gulf_War:_factor_analysis_of_self_reported_symptoms_ L2 - https://oem.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15550608 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -