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The association between total energy intake and early mortality: data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.
J Intern Med. 2004 Dec; 256(6):499-509.JI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

In animal studies, low energy intake (EI) has been associated with a longer lifespan. We examine whether EI is an independent risk factor for prospective all-cause mortality, cardiovascular and cancer mortality in humans.

DESIGN

Population-based, prospective cohort study.

SETTING AND SUBJECTS

The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 28 098 individuals, mean age 58.2 years, completed questionnaires on diet and life-style and attended a physical examination during 1991-96.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Information on mortality was acquired from national registries during a mean follow-up time of 6.6 years. Subjects were categorized by quartiles of total EI. The first quartile was used as a reference point in estimating multivariate relative risks (RR; 95% CI, Cox's regression model). Adjustments were made for confounding by age and various life-style factors.

RESULTS

The lowest total mortality was observed for women in the third quartile (RR: 0.74; CI: 0.57-0.96) and for men in the second and third quartiles (RR: 0.85; CI: 0.69-1.04 and RR: 0.85; CI: 0.69-1.04 respectively). Similar U-shaped patterns were observed for cardiovascular mortality amongst women and cancer mortality amongst men. A statistically significant trend (P = 0.029) towards lower cardiovascular mortality from the first to the fourth quartile was observed for men.

CONCLUSIONS

Low caloric consumers did, on average, not have lower mortality than average or high caloric consumers. Generally, individuals approximately meeting national recommendations for total EI had the lowest mortality. For men, high caloric intake was associated with lower cardiovascular mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Lund University, University Hospital (UMAS), S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. margret.leosdottir@medforsk.mas.lu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15554951

Citation

Leosdottir, M, et al. "The Association Between Total Energy Intake and Early Mortality: Data From the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study." Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 256, no. 6, 2004, pp. 499-509.
Leosdottir M, Nilsson P, Nilsson JA, et al. The association between total energy intake and early mortality: data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. J Intern Med. 2004;256(6):499-509.
Leosdottir, M., Nilsson, P., Nilsson, J. A., Månsson, H., & Berglund, G. (2004). The association between total energy intake and early mortality: data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Journal of Internal Medicine, 256(6), 499-509.
Leosdottir M, et al. The Association Between Total Energy Intake and Early Mortality: Data From the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. J Intern Med. 2004;256(6):499-509. PubMed PMID: 15554951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association between total energy intake and early mortality: data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. AU - Leosdottir,M, AU - Nilsson,P, AU - Nilsson,J-A, AU - Månsson,H, AU - Berglund,G, PY - 2004/11/24/pubmed PY - 2004/12/22/medline PY - 2004/11/24/entrez SP - 499 EP - 509 JF - Journal of internal medicine JO - J. Intern. Med. VL - 256 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: In animal studies, low energy intake (EI) has been associated with a longer lifespan. We examine whether EI is an independent risk factor for prospective all-cause mortality, cardiovascular and cancer mortality in humans. DESIGN: Population-based, prospective cohort study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 28 098 individuals, mean age 58.2 years, completed questionnaires on diet and life-style and attended a physical examination during 1991-96. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Information on mortality was acquired from national registries during a mean follow-up time of 6.6 years. Subjects were categorized by quartiles of total EI. The first quartile was used as a reference point in estimating multivariate relative risks (RR; 95% CI, Cox's regression model). Adjustments were made for confounding by age and various life-style factors. RESULTS: The lowest total mortality was observed for women in the third quartile (RR: 0.74; CI: 0.57-0.96) and for men in the second and third quartiles (RR: 0.85; CI: 0.69-1.04 and RR: 0.85; CI: 0.69-1.04 respectively). Similar U-shaped patterns were observed for cardiovascular mortality amongst women and cancer mortality amongst men. A statistically significant trend (P = 0.029) towards lower cardiovascular mortality from the first to the fourth quartile was observed for men. CONCLUSIONS: Low caloric consumers did, on average, not have lower mortality than average or high caloric consumers. Generally, individuals approximately meeting national recommendations for total EI had the lowest mortality. For men, high caloric intake was associated with lower cardiovascular mortality. SN - 0954-6820 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15554951/The_association_between_total_energy_intake_and_early_mortality:_data_from_the_Malmö_Diet_and_Cancer_Study_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0954-6820&date=2004&volume=256&issue=6&spage=499 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -