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Vitamin K status in patients with Crohn's disease and relationship to bone turnover.
Am J Gastroenterol 2004; 99(11):2178-85AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is a high prevalence of osteopenia among patients with Crohn's disease (CD). There is some evidence that a deficiency of certain bone-active nutrients (including vitamins K and D) may have a partial role in this bone loss.

AIMS

To compare the intake and the status of vitamin K in CD patients, currently in remission, with age- and sex-matched controls, and furthermore to investigate the relationship between vitamin K status and bone turnover in these patients.

SUBJECTS

CD patients (n = 44; mean age: 36.9 yr) and matched controls (n = 44) were recruited from the Cork University Hospital and Cork City area, respectively.

METHODS

Bloods were analyzed for the total and undercarboxylated (Glu)-osteocalcin and urine analyzed for cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx). Vitamin K(1) intake was estimated by food frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

Vitamin K(1) intake in CD patients tended to be lower than that of controls (mean (SD), 117 (82) vs 148 (80) mug/d, respectively; p= 0.059). Glu and NTx concentrations in CD patients were higher than controls (mean (SD), 5.1 (3.1) vs 3.9 (2.1) ng/ml, respectively; p= 0.03 for Glu; and 49 (41) vs 25.8 (19.5) nM BCE/mM creatinine, respectively; p= 0.001 for NTx). In CD patients, Glu was significantly correlated with NTx (r= 0.488; p < 0.001), even after controlling for age, gender, vitamin D status, calcium intake, and corticosteroid use.

CONCLUSION

Vitamin K status of CD patients was lower than that of the healthy controls. Furthermore, the rate of bone resorption in the CD was inversely correlated with vitamin K status, suggesting that it might be another etiological factor for CD-related osteopenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, and Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College, Cork, Ireland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15555000

Citation

Duggan, Paula, et al. "Vitamin K Status in Patients With Crohn's Disease and Relationship to Bone Turnover." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 99, no. 11, 2004, pp. 2178-85.
Duggan P, O'Brien M, Kiely M, et al. Vitamin K status in patients with Crohn's disease and relationship to bone turnover. Am J Gastroenterol. 2004;99(11):2178-85.
Duggan, P., O'Brien, M., Kiely, M., McCarthy, J., Shanahan, F., & Cashman, K. D. (2004). Vitamin K status in patients with Crohn's disease and relationship to bone turnover. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 99(11), pp. 2178-85.
Duggan P, et al. Vitamin K Status in Patients With Crohn's Disease and Relationship to Bone Turnover. Am J Gastroenterol. 2004;99(11):2178-85. PubMed PMID: 15555000.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin K status in patients with Crohn's disease and relationship to bone turnover. AU - Duggan,Paula, AU - O'Brien,Maria, AU - Kiely,Mairead, AU - McCarthy,Jane, AU - Shanahan,Fergus, AU - Cashman,Kevin D, PY - 2004/11/24/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/11/24/entrez SP - 2178 EP - 85 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 99 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is a high prevalence of osteopenia among patients with Crohn's disease (CD). There is some evidence that a deficiency of certain bone-active nutrients (including vitamins K and D) may have a partial role in this bone loss. AIMS: To compare the intake and the status of vitamin K in CD patients, currently in remission, with age- and sex-matched controls, and furthermore to investigate the relationship between vitamin K status and bone turnover in these patients. SUBJECTS: CD patients (n = 44; mean age: 36.9 yr) and matched controls (n = 44) were recruited from the Cork University Hospital and Cork City area, respectively. METHODS: Bloods were analyzed for the total and undercarboxylated (Glu)-osteocalcin and urine analyzed for cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx). Vitamin K(1) intake was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: Vitamin K(1) intake in CD patients tended to be lower than that of controls (mean (SD), 117 (82) vs 148 (80) mug/d, respectively; p= 0.059). Glu and NTx concentrations in CD patients were higher than controls (mean (SD), 5.1 (3.1) vs 3.9 (2.1) ng/ml, respectively; p= 0.03 for Glu; and 49 (41) vs 25.8 (19.5) nM BCE/mM creatinine, respectively; p= 0.001 for NTx). In CD patients, Glu was significantly correlated with NTx (r= 0.488; p < 0.001), even after controlling for age, gender, vitamin D status, calcium intake, and corticosteroid use. CONCLUSION: Vitamin K status of CD patients was lower than that of the healthy controls. Furthermore, the rate of bone resorption in the CD was inversely correlated with vitamin K status, suggesting that it might be another etiological factor for CD-related osteopenia. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15555000/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15555000 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -