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Neuromuscular adaptations and serum hormones in women during short-term intensive strength training.
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992; 64(2):106-11.EJ

Abstract

The effects were investigated in ten women of intensive heavy resistance strength training lasting for 3 weeks on electromyographic (EMG) activity, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and voluntary force production characteristics of leg extensor muscles. Blood samples for the determinations of serum hormones were taken from five of the subjects. Significant increases occurred in the higher force portions of the isometric force-time curve with an increase of 9.7 (SD 8.4)% (P less than 0.01) in maximal peak force. An increase of 15.8 (SD 20.9)% (P less than 0.05) took place also in the maximal neural activation (integrated EMG) of the trained muscles, while an enlargement of 4.6 (SD 7.4)% (P less than 0.05) occurred in the CSA of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Maximal force per muscle CSA increased significantly (P less than 0.05). No statistically significant changes were observed during the training in the mean concentrations of serum testosterone, free testosterone, cortisol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). The individual concentrations of serum testosterone:SHBG ratio correlated with the individual changes obtained during the training in the muscle CSA (r = 0.99; P less than 0.01). The present findings in women indicated that the increases in maximal strength during short-term but intensive strength training were primarily due to the increased voluntary activation of the trained muscles, while muscle hypertrophy remained limited in magnitude. Large interindividual differences in women in serum testosterone concentrations could indicate corresponding differences in muscle hypertrophy and strength development even during a short-term but intensive strength training period.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1555555

Citation

Häkkinen, K, et al. "Neuromuscular Adaptations and Serum Hormones in Women During Short-term Intensive Strength Training." European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, vol. 64, no. 2, 1992, pp. 106-11.
Häkkinen K, Pakarinen A, Kallinen M. Neuromuscular adaptations and serum hormones in women during short-term intensive strength training. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992;64(2):106-11.
Häkkinen, K., Pakarinen, A., & Kallinen, M. (1992). Neuromuscular adaptations and serum hormones in women during short-term intensive strength training. European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, 64(2), 106-11.
Häkkinen K, Pakarinen A, Kallinen M. Neuromuscular Adaptations and Serum Hormones in Women During Short-term Intensive Strength Training. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992;64(2):106-11. PubMed PMID: 1555555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuromuscular adaptations and serum hormones in women during short-term intensive strength training. AU - Häkkinen,K, AU - Pakarinen,A, AU - Kallinen,M, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez SP - 106 EP - 11 JF - European journal of applied physiology and occupational physiology JO - Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol VL - 64 IS - 2 N2 - The effects were investigated in ten women of intensive heavy resistance strength training lasting for 3 weeks on electromyographic (EMG) activity, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and voluntary force production characteristics of leg extensor muscles. Blood samples for the determinations of serum hormones were taken from five of the subjects. Significant increases occurred in the higher force portions of the isometric force-time curve with an increase of 9.7 (SD 8.4)% (P less than 0.01) in maximal peak force. An increase of 15.8 (SD 20.9)% (P less than 0.05) took place also in the maximal neural activation (integrated EMG) of the trained muscles, while an enlargement of 4.6 (SD 7.4)% (P less than 0.05) occurred in the CSA of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Maximal force per muscle CSA increased significantly (P less than 0.05). No statistically significant changes were observed during the training in the mean concentrations of serum testosterone, free testosterone, cortisol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). The individual concentrations of serum testosterone:SHBG ratio correlated with the individual changes obtained during the training in the muscle CSA (r = 0.99; P less than 0.01). The present findings in women indicated that the increases in maximal strength during short-term but intensive strength training were primarily due to the increased voluntary activation of the trained muscles, while muscle hypertrophy remained limited in magnitude. Large interindividual differences in women in serum testosterone concentrations could indicate corresponding differences in muscle hypertrophy and strength development even during a short-term but intensive strength training period. SN - 0301-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1555555/Neuromuscular_adaptations_and_serum_hormones_in_women_during_short_term_intensive_strength_training_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -