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Application of three-dimensional body scanner: observation of prevalence of metabolic syndrome.
Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec; 23(6):1313-23.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

This retrospective cross-sectional study correlates blood pressure, blood glucose, lipid and uric acid levels with anthropometric measurements.

METHODS

A total of 3975 visitors to the Department of Health Management were randomly selected to participate in this cross-sectional study. Whole body three-dimensional (3-D) laser scans were used to obtain anthropometric measurements. A health index (HI) was also designed based on anthropometric parameters. Subjects were defined as having metabolic syndrome when three of the following criteria were met: obesity (BMI of at least 30 kg/m(2); or a WHR of over 0.9 for males and 0.85 for females); triglyceride of at least 150 mg/dl; high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol below 35 mg/dl for males and 39 mg/dl for females; fasting sugar levels of at least 110 mg/dl and hypertension.

RESULTS

Of 3975 subjects, 341 (8.6%) met the criteria for diabetes mellitus (DM); of these, 32.8% were diagnosed with hypertension. This proportion exceeded 18% of the subjects had normal glucose levels. Of the 3975 subjects, 658 (16.6%) met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Proportionally, more male subjects than female subjects were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (18.5% vs 14.7%). Of these, central obesity, elevated triglyceride and low HDL-cholesterol were the main factors in men, while fasting glucose, hypertension and central obesity were the main factors in women. This investigation found that larger proportions of subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (41.1%) and DM (64.2%) than of subjects with normal glucose subjects, suffered from metabolic syndrome (9.5%).

CONCLUSIONS

3-D body scanning is useful in correlating pertinent factors with metabolic syndrome, these factors include central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia and hypertension.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kweishan, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC. einjd@adm.cgmh.org.twNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15556253

Citation

Lin, J D., et al. "Application of Three-dimensional Body Scanner: Observation of Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 23, no. 6, 2004, pp. 1313-23.
Lin JD, Chiou WK, Weng HF, et al. Application of three-dimensional body scanner: observation of prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Clin Nutr. 2004;23(6):1313-23.
Lin, J. D., Chiou, W. K., Weng, H. F., Fang, J. T., & Liu, T. H. (2004). Application of three-dimensional body scanner: observation of prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 23(6), 1313-23.
Lin JD, et al. Application of Three-dimensional Body Scanner: Observation of Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome. Clin Nutr. 2004;23(6):1313-23. PubMed PMID: 15556253.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of three-dimensional body scanner: observation of prevalence of metabolic syndrome. AU - Lin,J D, AU - Chiou,W K, AU - Weng,H F, AU - Fang,J T, AU - Liu,T H, PY - 2003/07/10/received PY - 2004/04/06/accepted PY - 2004/11/24/pubmed PY - 2005/4/13/medline PY - 2004/11/24/entrez SP - 1313 EP - 23 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 23 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: This retrospective cross-sectional study correlates blood pressure, blood glucose, lipid and uric acid levels with anthropometric measurements. METHODS: A total of 3975 visitors to the Department of Health Management were randomly selected to participate in this cross-sectional study. Whole body three-dimensional (3-D) laser scans were used to obtain anthropometric measurements. A health index (HI) was also designed based on anthropometric parameters. Subjects were defined as having metabolic syndrome when three of the following criteria were met: obesity (BMI of at least 30 kg/m(2); or a WHR of over 0.9 for males and 0.85 for females); triglyceride of at least 150 mg/dl; high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol below 35 mg/dl for males and 39 mg/dl for females; fasting sugar levels of at least 110 mg/dl and hypertension. RESULTS: Of 3975 subjects, 341 (8.6%) met the criteria for diabetes mellitus (DM); of these, 32.8% were diagnosed with hypertension. This proportion exceeded 18% of the subjects had normal glucose levels. Of the 3975 subjects, 658 (16.6%) met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Proportionally, more male subjects than female subjects were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (18.5% vs 14.7%). Of these, central obesity, elevated triglyceride and low HDL-cholesterol were the main factors in men, while fasting glucose, hypertension and central obesity were the main factors in women. This investigation found that larger proportions of subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (41.1%) and DM (64.2%) than of subjects with normal glucose subjects, suffered from metabolic syndrome (9.5%). CONCLUSIONS: 3-D body scanning is useful in correlating pertinent factors with metabolic syndrome, these factors include central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia and hypertension. SN - 0261-5614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15556253/Application_of_three_dimensional_body_scanner:_observation_of_prevalence_of_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0261561404000639 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -