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Acne: topical treatment.
Clin Dermatol. 2004 Sep-Oct; 22(5):398-407.CD

Abstract

Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease, affecting about 70-80% of adolescents and young adults. It is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit.(1) The influence of androgens at the onset of adolescence leads to an enlargement of the sebaceous gland and a rise in sebum production. Additional increased proliferation and altered differentiation of the follicular epithelium eventually blocks the pilosebaceous duct, leading to development of the microcomedo as the primary acne lesion. Concomitantly and subsequently, colonization with Propionibacterium acnes increases, followed by induction of inflammatory reactions from bacteria, ductal corneocytes, and sebaceous proinflammatory agents (Fig 1).(2-5)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Otto von Guericke University, Leipzoger Strasse 44, D-39120 Magdeburg, Germany.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15556726

Citation

Krautheim, Andrea, and Harald P M. Gollnick. "Acne: Topical Treatment." Clinics in Dermatology, vol. 22, no. 5, 2004, pp. 398-407.
Krautheim A, Gollnick HP. Acne: topical treatment. Clin Dermatol. 2004;22(5):398-407.
Krautheim, A., & Gollnick, H. P. (2004). Acne: topical treatment. Clinics in Dermatology, 22(5), 398-407.
Krautheim A, Gollnick HP. Acne: Topical Treatment. Clin Dermatol. 2004;22(5):398-407. PubMed PMID: 15556726.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acne: topical treatment. AU - Krautheim,Andrea, AU - Gollnick,Harald P M, PY - 2004/11/24/pubmed PY - 2005/3/11/medline PY - 2004/11/24/entrez SP - 398 EP - 407 JF - Clinics in dermatology JO - Clin. Dermatol. VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease, affecting about 70-80% of adolescents and young adults. It is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit.(1) The influence of androgens at the onset of adolescence leads to an enlargement of the sebaceous gland and a rise in sebum production. Additional increased proliferation and altered differentiation of the follicular epithelium eventually blocks the pilosebaceous duct, leading to development of the microcomedo as the primary acne lesion. Concomitantly and subsequently, colonization with Propionibacterium acnes increases, followed by induction of inflammatory reactions from bacteria, ductal corneocytes, and sebaceous proinflammatory agents (Fig 1).(2-5) SN - 0738-081X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15556726/Acne:_topical_treatment_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X04000422 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -