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A comprehensive examination of health conditions associated with obesity in older adults.
Am J Prev Med. 2004 Dec; 27(5):385-90.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Over 70% of older adults in the United States are overweight or obese. To examine the overall health burden of obesity in older adults, the Vitamins and Lifestyle cohort study of western Washington State recruited 73,003 adults aged 50 to 76 who completed a self-administered questionnaire on current height and weight, medical history, and risk factors.

METHODS

Cross-sectional analysis of body mass index (BMI) and health conditions was performed using data collected in 2000 to 2002. Participants were categorized as normal weight, overweight, obese I, or obese II/III using BMI cut-points. Health conditions included 7 serious diseases, 2 conditions associated with cardiovascular disease risk, 23 medical conditions, and 11 health complaints. Odds ratios (ORs) from logistic regression models were used to examine associations of the four BMI categories with each health condition. Analyses were gender stratified and adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, and smoking status.

RESULTS

Among women, 34% were overweight, 16% in the obese I category, and 10% in obese categories II/III. Among men, 49% were overweight, 18% in the obese I category, and 6% in obese categories II/III. Overall, 37 of 41 conditions examined for women and 29 of 41 conditions examined for men were associated with increased levels of BMI (trend p <0.05 for all models). For women and men, respectively, the highest ORs comparing obese II/III to normal weight were diabetes (OR=12.5 and 8.3), knee replacement (OR=11.7 and 6.1), and hypertension (OR=5.4 and 5.6). Obesity also increased the odds of several rare diseases such as pancreatitis (OR=1.9 and 1.5) and health complaints such as chronic fatigue (OR=3.7 and 3.5) and insomnia (OR=3.5 and 3.1).

CONCLUSIONS

A broad range of diseases and health complaints are associated with obesity. Clinicians should be aware of the diverse ways in which being overweight or obese may affect the health of their patients when counseling them about weight loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention Research Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA. ruthp@sdfoundation.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15556738

Citation

Patterson, Ruth E., et al. "A Comprehensive Examination of Health Conditions Associated With Obesity in Older Adults." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 27, no. 5, 2004, pp. 385-90.
Patterson RE, Frank LL, Kristal AR, et al. A comprehensive examination of health conditions associated with obesity in older adults. Am J Prev Med. 2004;27(5):385-90.
Patterson, R. E., Frank, L. L., Kristal, A. R., & White, E. (2004). A comprehensive examination of health conditions associated with obesity in older adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 27(5), 385-90.
Patterson RE, et al. A Comprehensive Examination of Health Conditions Associated With Obesity in Older Adults. Am J Prev Med. 2004;27(5):385-90. PubMed PMID: 15556738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comprehensive examination of health conditions associated with obesity in older adults. AU - Patterson,Ruth E, AU - Frank,Laura L, AU - Kristal,Alan R, AU - White,Emily, PY - 2004/11/24/pubmed PY - 2005/3/11/medline PY - 2004/11/24/entrez SP - 385 EP - 90 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Over 70% of older adults in the United States are overweight or obese. To examine the overall health burden of obesity in older adults, the Vitamins and Lifestyle cohort study of western Washington State recruited 73,003 adults aged 50 to 76 who completed a self-administered questionnaire on current height and weight, medical history, and risk factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of body mass index (BMI) and health conditions was performed using data collected in 2000 to 2002. Participants were categorized as normal weight, overweight, obese I, or obese II/III using BMI cut-points. Health conditions included 7 serious diseases, 2 conditions associated with cardiovascular disease risk, 23 medical conditions, and 11 health complaints. Odds ratios (ORs) from logistic regression models were used to examine associations of the four BMI categories with each health condition. Analyses were gender stratified and adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, and smoking status. RESULTS: Among women, 34% were overweight, 16% in the obese I category, and 10% in obese categories II/III. Among men, 49% were overweight, 18% in the obese I category, and 6% in obese categories II/III. Overall, 37 of 41 conditions examined for women and 29 of 41 conditions examined for men were associated with increased levels of BMI (trend p <0.05 for all models). For women and men, respectively, the highest ORs comparing obese II/III to normal weight were diabetes (OR=12.5 and 8.3), knee replacement (OR=11.7 and 6.1), and hypertension (OR=5.4 and 5.6). Obesity also increased the odds of several rare diseases such as pancreatitis (OR=1.9 and 1.5) and health complaints such as chronic fatigue (OR=3.7 and 3.5) and insomnia (OR=3.5 and 3.1). CONCLUSIONS: A broad range of diseases and health complaints are associated with obesity. Clinicians should be aware of the diverse ways in which being overweight or obese may affect the health of their patients when counseling them about weight loss. SN - 0749-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15556738/A_comprehensive_examination_of_health_conditions_associated_with_obesity_in_older_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(04)00197-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -