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Food consumption by children and the risk of childhood acute leukemia.
Am J Epidemiol 2004; 160(11):1098-107AJ

Abstract

The possible relation between child's early diet and risk of childhood leukemia has remained largely unexplored. The authors' objective was to determine what particular foods consumed early in life (first 2 years) are associated with risk of childhood leukemia in a 1995-2002 case-control study of a diverse California population. Dietary data were obtained from a questionnaire administered to the child's caregiver. Conditional logistic regression was used to analyze 328 case-control sets matched on age, sex, Hispanic status, and maternal race. Regular consumption of oranges/bananas (odds ratio = 0.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.26, 0.94) and orange juice (odds ratio = 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.94) during the first 2 years of life was associated with a reduction in risk of childhood leukemia diagnosed between the ages of 2 and 14 years. Restricting the analysis to leukemia diagnosed between the ages of 2 and 5 years reflected a similar pattern of reduced risk. No association between eating hot dogs/lunch meats and risk of leukemia was found. These results suggest that fruits or fruit juices that contain vitamin C and/or potassium may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia, especially if they are consumed on a regular basis during the first 2 years of life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Public Health Biology and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7380, USA. kwan@berkeley.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15561989

Citation

Kwan, Marilyn L., et al. "Food Consumption By Children and the Risk of Childhood Acute Leukemia." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 160, no. 11, 2004, pp. 1098-107.
Kwan ML, Block G, Selvin S, et al. Food consumption by children and the risk of childhood acute leukemia. Am J Epidemiol. 2004;160(11):1098-107.
Kwan, M. L., Block, G., Selvin, S., Month, S., & Buffler, P. A. (2004). Food consumption by children and the risk of childhood acute leukemia. American Journal of Epidemiology, 160(11), pp. 1098-107.
Kwan ML, et al. Food Consumption By Children and the Risk of Childhood Acute Leukemia. Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Dec 1;160(11):1098-107. PubMed PMID: 15561989.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food consumption by children and the risk of childhood acute leukemia. AU - Kwan,Marilyn L, AU - Block,Gladys, AU - Selvin,Steve, AU - Month,Stacy, AU - Buffler,Patricia A, PY - 2004/11/25/pubmed PY - 2004/12/22/medline PY - 2004/11/25/entrez SP - 1098 EP - 107 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 160 IS - 11 N2 - The possible relation between child's early diet and risk of childhood leukemia has remained largely unexplored. The authors' objective was to determine what particular foods consumed early in life (first 2 years) are associated with risk of childhood leukemia in a 1995-2002 case-control study of a diverse California population. Dietary data were obtained from a questionnaire administered to the child's caregiver. Conditional logistic regression was used to analyze 328 case-control sets matched on age, sex, Hispanic status, and maternal race. Regular consumption of oranges/bananas (odds ratio = 0.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.26, 0.94) and orange juice (odds ratio = 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.94) during the first 2 years of life was associated with a reduction in risk of childhood leukemia diagnosed between the ages of 2 and 14 years. Restricting the analysis to leukemia diagnosed between the ages of 2 and 5 years reflected a similar pattern of reduced risk. No association between eating hot dogs/lunch meats and risk of leukemia was found. These results suggest that fruits or fruit juices that contain vitamin C and/or potassium may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia, especially if they are consumed on a regular basis during the first 2 years of life. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15561989/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwh317 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -