Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Racial and ethnic differences in microalbuminuria prevalence in a diabetes population: the pathways study.
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Jan; 16(1):219-28.JA

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine whether racial or ethnic differences in prevalence of diabetic microalbuminuria were observed in a large primary care population in which comparable access to health care exists. A cross-sectional analysis of survey and automated laboratory data 2969 primary care diabetic patients of a large regional health maintenance organization was conducted. Study data were analyzed for racial/ethnic differences in microalbuminuria (30 to 300 mg albumin/g creatinine) and macroalbuminuria (>300 mg albumin/g creatinine) prevalence among diabetes registry-identified patients who completed a survey that assessed demographics, diabetes care, and depression. Computerized pharmacy, hospital, and laboratory data were linked to survey data for analysis. Racial/ethnic differences in the odds of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria were assessed by unconditional logistic regression, stratified by the presence of hypertension. Among those tested, the unadjusted prevalence of micro- or macroalbuminuria was 30.9%, which was similar among the various racial/ethnic groups. Among those without hypertension, microalbuminuria was twofold greater (odds ratio [OR] 2.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14 to 3.53) and macroalbuminuria was threefold greater (OR 3.17; 95% CI 1.09 to 9.26) for Asians as compared with whites. Among those with hypertension, adjusted odds of microalbuminuria were greater for Hispanics (OR 3.82; 95% CI 1.16 to 12.57) than whites, whereas adjusted odds of macroalbuminuria were threefold greater for blacks (OR 3.32; 95% CI 1.26 to 8.76) than for whites. For most racial/ethnic minorities, hypertriglyceridemia was significantly associated with greater odds of micro- and macroalbuminuria. Among a large primary care population, racial/ethnic differences exist in the adjusted prevalence of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria depending on hypertension status. In this setting, racial/ethnic differences in early diabetic nephropathy were observed despite comparable access to diabetes care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. youngb@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15563572

Citation

Young, Bessie A., et al. "Racial and Ethnic Differences in Microalbuminuria Prevalence in a Diabetes Population: the Pathways Study." Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, vol. 16, no. 1, 2005, pp. 219-28.
Young BA, Katon WJ, Von Korff M, et al. Racial and ethnic differences in microalbuminuria prevalence in a diabetes population: the pathways study. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005;16(1):219-28.
Young, B. A., Katon, W. J., Von Korff, M., Simon, G. E., Lin, E. H., Ciechanowski, P. S., Bush, T., Oliver, M., Ludman, E. J., & Boyko, E. J. (2005). Racial and ethnic differences in microalbuminuria prevalence in a diabetes population: the pathways study. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 16(1), 219-28.
Young BA, et al. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Microalbuminuria Prevalence in a Diabetes Population: the Pathways Study. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005;16(1):219-28. PubMed PMID: 15563572.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial and ethnic differences in microalbuminuria prevalence in a diabetes population: the pathways study. AU - Young,Bessie A, AU - Katon,Wayne J, AU - Von Korff,Michael, AU - Simon,Greg E, AU - Lin,Elizabeth H B, AU - Ciechanowski,Paul S, AU - Bush,Terry, AU - Oliver,Malia, AU - Ludman,Evette J, AU - Boyko,Edward J, Y1 - 2004/11/24/ PY - 2004/11/26/pubmed PY - 2005/6/23/medline PY - 2004/11/26/entrez SP - 219 EP - 28 JF - Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN JO - J Am Soc Nephrol VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - The objective of this study was to determine whether racial or ethnic differences in prevalence of diabetic microalbuminuria were observed in a large primary care population in which comparable access to health care exists. A cross-sectional analysis of survey and automated laboratory data 2969 primary care diabetic patients of a large regional health maintenance organization was conducted. Study data were analyzed for racial/ethnic differences in microalbuminuria (30 to 300 mg albumin/g creatinine) and macroalbuminuria (>300 mg albumin/g creatinine) prevalence among diabetes registry-identified patients who completed a survey that assessed demographics, diabetes care, and depression. Computerized pharmacy, hospital, and laboratory data were linked to survey data for analysis. Racial/ethnic differences in the odds of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria were assessed by unconditional logistic regression, stratified by the presence of hypertension. Among those tested, the unadjusted prevalence of micro- or macroalbuminuria was 30.9%, which was similar among the various racial/ethnic groups. Among those without hypertension, microalbuminuria was twofold greater (odds ratio [OR] 2.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14 to 3.53) and macroalbuminuria was threefold greater (OR 3.17; 95% CI 1.09 to 9.26) for Asians as compared with whites. Among those with hypertension, adjusted odds of microalbuminuria were greater for Hispanics (OR 3.82; 95% CI 1.16 to 12.57) than whites, whereas adjusted odds of macroalbuminuria were threefold greater for blacks (OR 3.32; 95% CI 1.26 to 8.76) than for whites. For most racial/ethnic minorities, hypertriglyceridemia was significantly associated with greater odds of micro- and macroalbuminuria. Among a large primary care population, racial/ethnic differences exist in the adjusted prevalence of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria depending on hypertension status. In this setting, racial/ethnic differences in early diabetic nephropathy were observed despite comparable access to diabetes care. SN - 1046-6673 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15563572/Racial_and_ethnic_differences_in_microalbuminuria_prevalence_in_a_diabetes_population:_the_pathways_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -