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Does primary care referral to an exercise programme increase physical activity one year later? A randomized controlled trial.
J Public Health (Oxf). 2005 Mar; 27(1):25-32.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effectiveness of a primary care referral scheme on increasing physical activity at 1 year from referral. Design Two-group randomized controlled trial recruiting primary care referrals to a borough-based exercise scheme. Setting A local authority borough in the north-west of England. Participants 545 patients defined as sedentary by a primary care practitioner. Intervention Referral to a local-authority exercise referral scheme and written information compared with written information only. Main outcome measures Meeting physical activity target at 12 months following referral, with a secondary outcome measured at 6 months from referral.

RESULTS

At 12 months, a non-significant increase of 5 per cent was observed in the intervention compared with control group, for participation in at least 90 minutes of moderate/vigorous activity per week (25.8 versus 20.4 per cent, OR 1.45, 0.84 to 2.50, p = 0.18). At 6 months, a 10 per cent treatment effect was observed which was significant (22.6 versus 13.6 per cent, OR 1.67, 1.08 to 2.60, p = 0.05). The intervention increased satisfaction with information but this did not influence adherence with physical activity.

CONCLUSION

Community-based physical activity referral schemes have some impact on reducing sedentary behaviour in the short-term, but which is unlikely to be sustained and lead to benefits in terms of health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bolton Primary Care Trust, St Peters House, Silverwell Street, Bolton BL1 1PP, UK. roger.harrison@bolton.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15564275

Citation

Harrison, Roger A., et al. "Does Primary Care Referral to an Exercise Programme Increase Physical Activity One Year Later? a Randomized Controlled Trial." Journal of Public Health (Oxford, England), vol. 27, no. 1, 2005, pp. 25-32.
Harrison RA, Roberts C, Elton PJ. Does primary care referral to an exercise programme increase physical activity one year later? A randomized controlled trial. J Public Health (Oxf). 2005;27(1):25-32.
Harrison, R. A., Roberts, C., & Elton, P. J. (2005). Does primary care referral to an exercise programme increase physical activity one year later? A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Public Health (Oxford, England), 27(1), 25-32.
Harrison RA, Roberts C, Elton PJ. Does Primary Care Referral to an Exercise Programme Increase Physical Activity One Year Later? a Randomized Controlled Trial. J Public Health (Oxf). 2005;27(1):25-32. PubMed PMID: 15564275.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does primary care referral to an exercise programme increase physical activity one year later? A randomized controlled trial. AU - Harrison,Roger A, AU - Roberts,Chris, AU - Elton,Peter J, Y1 - 2004/11/25/ PY - 2004/11/27/pubmed PY - 2005/9/2/medline PY - 2004/11/27/entrez SP - 25 EP - 32 JF - Journal of public health (Oxford, England) JO - J Public Health (Oxf) VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of a primary care referral scheme on increasing physical activity at 1 year from referral. Design Two-group randomized controlled trial recruiting primary care referrals to a borough-based exercise scheme. Setting A local authority borough in the north-west of England. Participants 545 patients defined as sedentary by a primary care practitioner. Intervention Referral to a local-authority exercise referral scheme and written information compared with written information only. Main outcome measures Meeting physical activity target at 12 months following referral, with a secondary outcome measured at 6 months from referral. RESULTS: At 12 months, a non-significant increase of 5 per cent was observed in the intervention compared with control group, for participation in at least 90 minutes of moderate/vigorous activity per week (25.8 versus 20.4 per cent, OR 1.45, 0.84 to 2.50, p = 0.18). At 6 months, a 10 per cent treatment effect was observed which was significant (22.6 versus 13.6 per cent, OR 1.67, 1.08 to 2.60, p = 0.05). The intervention increased satisfaction with information but this did not influence adherence with physical activity. CONCLUSION: Community-based physical activity referral schemes have some impact on reducing sedentary behaviour in the short-term, but which is unlikely to be sustained and lead to benefits in terms of health. SN - 1741-3842 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15564275/Does_primary_care_referral_to_an_exercise_programme_increase_physical_activity_one_year_later_A_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jpubhealth/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/pubmed/fdh197 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -