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Postprandial glucose response to Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes.
J Am Diet Assoc 2004; 104(12):1854-8JA

Abstract

The objective of this study is to examine the glycemic response to common Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-four Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes participated. Subjects were allocated to eat a pair of test meals in random order. Test meals included plain porridge with lean pork (meal 1A), plain porridge and Shrimp Shao Mai (Doll Brand, Winner Food Products Limited, Hong Kong) (meal 1B), boiled rice with boiled egg white (meal 2A), fried rice with whole egg (meal 2B), plain noodles in clear soup (meal 3A), and Pickled Vegetable and Pork-flavored Instant Bowl Noodles (Doll Brand, Winner Food Products Limited) (meal 3B). Nutritional content of the meals was calculated from the nutritional label on the food package and the food composition table. Plasma glucose was checked before the meal and in 30-minute intervals for up to 4 hours after the meal. Significant differences in the area under the curve of glucose up to 2 hours after the meal were detected between meal 1A and 2A (P =.044), 1A and 3A (P =.001), and 3A and 3B (P =.017). The results suggest that fat alone does not alter the glycemic response to rice or porridge. Porridge produces a higher glycemic response than rice and noodles despite similar carbohydrate contents, and different noodles lead to differences in glycemic excursion, suggesting that the glycemic index of common Chinese foods is affected by cooking methods and food processing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dietetics, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, 30 Gascoign Road, Hong Kong, ROC. snowdrop_myc@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15565080

Citation

Chan, Eliza M Y., et al. "Postprandial Glucose Response to Chinese Foods in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 12, 2004, pp. 1854-8.
Chan EM, Cheng WM, Tiu SC, et al. Postprandial glucose response to Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(12):1854-8.
Chan, E. M., Cheng, W. M., Tiu, S. C., & Wong, L. L. (2004). Postprandial glucose response to Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(12), pp. 1854-8.
Chan EM, et al. Postprandial Glucose Response to Chinese Foods in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(12):1854-8. PubMed PMID: 15565080.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postprandial glucose response to Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes. AU - Chan,Eliza M Y, AU - Cheng,Winnie M W, AU - Tiu,Sau-Cheung, AU - Wong,Lily L L, PY - 2004/11/27/pubmed PY - 2005/1/19/medline PY - 2004/11/27/entrez SP - 1854 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 12 N2 - The objective of this study is to examine the glycemic response to common Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-four Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes participated. Subjects were allocated to eat a pair of test meals in random order. Test meals included plain porridge with lean pork (meal 1A), plain porridge and Shrimp Shao Mai (Doll Brand, Winner Food Products Limited, Hong Kong) (meal 1B), boiled rice with boiled egg white (meal 2A), fried rice with whole egg (meal 2B), plain noodles in clear soup (meal 3A), and Pickled Vegetable and Pork-flavored Instant Bowl Noodles (Doll Brand, Winner Food Products Limited) (meal 3B). Nutritional content of the meals was calculated from the nutritional label on the food package and the food composition table. Plasma glucose was checked before the meal and in 30-minute intervals for up to 4 hours after the meal. Significant differences in the area under the curve of glucose up to 2 hours after the meal were detected between meal 1A and 2A (P =.044), 1A and 3A (P =.001), and 3A and 3B (P =.017). The results suggest that fat alone does not alter the glycemic response to rice or porridge. Porridge produces a higher glycemic response than rice and noodles despite similar carbohydrate contents, and different noodles lead to differences in glycemic excursion, suggesting that the glycemic index of common Chinese foods is affected by cooking methods and food processing. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15565080/Postprandial_glucose_response_to_Chinese_foods_in_patients_with_type_2_diabetes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822304015676 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -