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Violence against women in New Zealand: prevalence and health consequences.
N Z Med J. 2004 Nov 26; 117(1206):U1173.NZ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study reports on a large cross-sectional study of violence against women in New Zealand, and outlines the health consequences associated with intimate partner violence (IPV).

METHODS

The study population was women aged 18-64 years in Auckland and north Waikato. A population-based cluster-sampling scheme was used, with face-to-face interviews with one randomly selected woman from each household. Analyses included calculation of prevalence rates and logistic regression models to determine associations.

RESULTS

The overall response rate was 66.9%, n=2,855. Fifteen percent of participants in Auckland and 17% in the north Waikato reported at least one act of physical violence inflicted by non-partners in their lifetime. Sexual violence by non-partners was reported by 9% and 12% of women in Auckland and Waikato respectively. Among ever-partnered women, 33% in Auckland and 39% in Waikato had experienced at least one act of physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner. Victims of IPV were two times more likely to have visited a healthcare provider in the previous 4 weeks. IPV was significantly associated with current health effects, including: self-perceived poor health, physical health problems (eg, pain), and mental health problems (eg, suicide attempts).

CONCLUSION

The high prevalence of violence and its pervasive association with a wide range of physical and mental health effects suggest that it warrants consideration as a significant factor underpinning ill-health in women. Prevention efforts must concentrate not only on reducing the perpetration of violence against women, in particular IPV, but also on developing and sustaining appropriate responses to victims of violence within the health system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Social and Community Health, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. j.fanslow@auckland.ac.nzNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15570342

Citation

Fanslow, Janet, and Elizabeth Robinson. "Violence Against Women in New Zealand: Prevalence and Health Consequences." The New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 117, no. 1206, 2004, pp. U1173.
Fanslow J, Robinson E. Violence against women in New Zealand: prevalence and health consequences. N Z Med J. 2004;117(1206):U1173.
Fanslow, J., & Robinson, E. (2004). Violence against women in New Zealand: prevalence and health consequences. The New Zealand Medical Journal, 117(1206), U1173.
Fanslow J, Robinson E. Violence Against Women in New Zealand: Prevalence and Health Consequences. N Z Med J. 2004 Nov 26;117(1206):U1173. PubMed PMID: 15570342.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Violence against women in New Zealand: prevalence and health consequences. AU - Fanslow,Janet, AU - Robinson,Elizabeth, Y1 - 2004/11/26/ PY - 2004/12/1/pubmed PY - 2005/3/23/medline PY - 2004/12/1/entrez SP - U1173 EP - U1173 JF - The New Zealand medical journal JO - N Z Med J VL - 117 IS - 1206 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study reports on a large cross-sectional study of violence against women in New Zealand, and outlines the health consequences associated with intimate partner violence (IPV). METHODS: The study population was women aged 18-64 years in Auckland and north Waikato. A population-based cluster-sampling scheme was used, with face-to-face interviews with one randomly selected woman from each household. Analyses included calculation of prevalence rates and logistic regression models to determine associations. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 66.9%, n=2,855. Fifteen percent of participants in Auckland and 17% in the north Waikato reported at least one act of physical violence inflicted by non-partners in their lifetime. Sexual violence by non-partners was reported by 9% and 12% of women in Auckland and Waikato respectively. Among ever-partnered women, 33% in Auckland and 39% in Waikato had experienced at least one act of physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner. Victims of IPV were two times more likely to have visited a healthcare provider in the previous 4 weeks. IPV was significantly associated with current health effects, including: self-perceived poor health, physical health problems (eg, pain), and mental health problems (eg, suicide attempts). CONCLUSION: The high prevalence of violence and its pervasive association with a wide range of physical and mental health effects suggest that it warrants consideration as a significant factor underpinning ill-health in women. Prevention efforts must concentrate not only on reducing the perpetration of violence against women, in particular IPV, but also on developing and sustaining appropriate responses to victims of violence within the health system. SN - 1175-8716 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15570342/Violence_against_women_in_New_Zealand:_prevalence_and_health_consequences_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/sexualassault.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -