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Quantitation of resistance training using the session rating of perceived exertion method.
J Strength Cond Res. 2004 Nov; 18(4):796-802.JS

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to apply the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE) method, which is known to work with aerobic training, to resistance training. Ten men (26.1 +/- 10.2 years) and 10 women (22.2 +/- 1.8 years), habituated to both aerobic and resistance training, performed 3 x 30 minutes aerobic training bouts on the cycle ergometer at intensities of 56%, 71%, and 83% Vo(2) peak and then rated the global intensity using the session RPE technique (e.g., 0-10) 30 minutes after the end of the session. They also performed 3 x 30 minutes resistance exercise bouts with 2 sets of 6 exercises at 50% (15 repetitions), 70% (10 repetitions), and 90% (4 repetitions) of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). After each set the exercisers rated the intensity of that exercise using the RPE scale. Thirty minutes after the end of the bout they rated the intensity of the whole session and of only the lifting components of the session, using the session RPE method. The rated intensity of exercise increased with the %Vo(2) peak and the %1RM. There was a general correspondence between the relative intensity (%Vo(2) peak and % 1RM) and the session RPE. Between different types of resistance exercise at the same relative intensity, the average RPE after each lift varied widely. The resistance training session RPE increased as the intensity increased despite a decrease in the total work performed (p < 0.05). Mean RPE and session RPE-lifting only also grew with increased intensity (p < 0.05). In many cases, the mean RPE, session RPE, and session RPE- lifting only measurements were different at given exercise intensities (p < 0.05). The session RPE appears to be a viable method for quantitating the intensity of resistance training, generally comparable to aerobic training. However, the session RPE may meaningfully underestimate the average intensity rated immediately after each set.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI 54601, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15574104

Citation

Sweet, Travis W., et al. "Quantitation of Resistance Training Using the Session Rating of Perceived Exertion Method." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 18, no. 4, 2004, pp. 796-802.
Sweet TW, Foster C, McGuigan MR, et al. Quantitation of resistance training using the session rating of perceived exertion method. J Strength Cond Res. 2004;18(4):796-802.
Sweet, T. W., Foster, C., McGuigan, M. R., & Brice, G. (2004). Quantitation of resistance training using the session rating of perceived exertion method. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 18(4), 796-802.
Sweet TW, et al. Quantitation of Resistance Training Using the Session Rating of Perceived Exertion Method. J Strength Cond Res. 2004;18(4):796-802. PubMed PMID: 15574104.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quantitation of resistance training using the session rating of perceived exertion method. AU - Sweet,Travis W, AU - Foster,Carl, AU - McGuigan,Michael R, AU - Brice,Glenn, PY - 2004/12/3/pubmed PY - 2005/3/11/medline PY - 2004/12/3/entrez SP - 796 EP - 802 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 18 IS - 4 N2 - The purpose of this study was to apply the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE) method, which is known to work with aerobic training, to resistance training. Ten men (26.1 +/- 10.2 years) and 10 women (22.2 +/- 1.8 years), habituated to both aerobic and resistance training, performed 3 x 30 minutes aerobic training bouts on the cycle ergometer at intensities of 56%, 71%, and 83% Vo(2) peak and then rated the global intensity using the session RPE technique (e.g., 0-10) 30 minutes after the end of the session. They also performed 3 x 30 minutes resistance exercise bouts with 2 sets of 6 exercises at 50% (15 repetitions), 70% (10 repetitions), and 90% (4 repetitions) of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). After each set the exercisers rated the intensity of that exercise using the RPE scale. Thirty minutes after the end of the bout they rated the intensity of the whole session and of only the lifting components of the session, using the session RPE method. The rated intensity of exercise increased with the %Vo(2) peak and the %1RM. There was a general correspondence between the relative intensity (%Vo(2) peak and % 1RM) and the session RPE. Between different types of resistance exercise at the same relative intensity, the average RPE after each lift varied widely. The resistance training session RPE increased as the intensity increased despite a decrease in the total work performed (p < 0.05). Mean RPE and session RPE-lifting only also grew with increased intensity (p < 0.05). In many cases, the mean RPE, session RPE, and session RPE- lifting only measurements were different at given exercise intensities (p < 0.05). The session RPE appears to be a viable method for quantitating the intensity of resistance training, generally comparable to aerobic training. However, the session RPE may meaningfully underestimate the average intensity rated immediately after each set. SN - 1064-8011 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15574104/Quantitation_of_resistance_training_using_the_session_rating_of_perceived_exertion_method_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -