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Distressing near-death experiences.
Psychiatry. 1992 Feb; 55(1):95-110.P

Abstract

Most reported near-death experiences include profound feelings of peace, joy, and cosmic unity. Less familiar are the reports following close brushes with death of experiences that are partially or entirely unpleasant, frightening, or frankly hellish. While little is known about the antecedents or aftereffects of these distressing experiences, there appear to be three distinct types, involving (1) phenomenology similar to peaceful near-death experiences but interpreted as unpleasant, (2) a sense of nonexistence or eternal void, or (3) graphic hellish landscapes and entities. While the first type may eventually convert to a typical peaceful experience, the relationship of all three types to prototypical near-death experiences merits further study. The effect of the distressing experience in the lives of individuals deserves exploration, as the psychological impact may be profound and long-lasting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Centr, Farmington 06030.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1557473

Citation

Greyson, B, and N E. Bush. "Distressing Near-death Experiences." Psychiatry, vol. 55, no. 1, 1992, pp. 95-110.
Greyson B, Bush NE. Distressing near-death experiences. Psychiatry. 1992;55(1):95-110.
Greyson, B., & Bush, N. E. (1992). Distressing near-death experiences. Psychiatry, 55(1), 95-110.
Greyson B, Bush NE. Distressing Near-death Experiences. Psychiatry. 1992;55(1):95-110. PubMed PMID: 1557473.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Distressing near-death experiences. AU - Greyson,B, AU - Bush,N E, PY - 1992/2/1/pubmed PY - 1992/2/1/medline PY - 1992/2/1/entrez SP - 95 EP - 110 JF - Psychiatry JO - Psychiatry VL - 55 IS - 1 N2 - Most reported near-death experiences include profound feelings of peace, joy, and cosmic unity. Less familiar are the reports following close brushes with death of experiences that are partially or entirely unpleasant, frightening, or frankly hellish. While little is known about the antecedents or aftereffects of these distressing experiences, there appear to be three distinct types, involving (1) phenomenology similar to peaceful near-death experiences but interpreted as unpleasant, (2) a sense of nonexistence or eternal void, or (3) graphic hellish landscapes and entities. While the first type may eventually convert to a typical peaceful experience, the relationship of all three types to prototypical near-death experiences merits further study. The effect of the distressing experience in the lives of individuals deserves exploration, as the psychological impact may be profound and long-lasting. SN - 0033-2747 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1557473/Distressing_near_death_experiences_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00332747.1992.11024583 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -