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Asthma and sensitization in a community with low indoor allergen levels and low pet-keeping frequency.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Dec; 114(6):1389-94.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little is known about causes of asthma and sensitization in desert countries.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate risk factors associated with asthma and sensitization in Kuwait.

METHODS

One hundred sixty children (9-16 years) with physician-diagnosed asthma were recruited and matched (age, sex) with 303 healthy controls. Risk factors were assessed by questionnaires, determination of sensitization status (skin tests and IgE), and home allergen exposure (mite, cat, dog, cockroach; ELISA).

RESULTS

Home allergen levels and frequency of pet ownership were very low (cat, 4.1%; dog, 1.5%). The risk of cat sensitization increased significantly among cat owners (odds ratio [OR], 3.53; 95% CI, 1.33-9.41; P = .01), and in children with reported contact with cats during the first year of life (OR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.17-5.80; P = .019). In the multivariate analysis, maternal atopy (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.13-2.75; P = .01) and cat ownership (OR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.19-9.25; P = .02) remained significant associates of cat sensitization. Current dog ownership significantly increased the risk of sensitization to dog (OR, 6.05; 95% CI, 1.33-27.54; P = .02). In the multivariate analysis, dog ownership remained the only significant associate of dog sensitization (OR, 6.02; 95% CI, 1.30-27.96; P = .02). Sensitization to Alternaria was the strongest independent associate of the asthma group. Family history of asthma, history of whooping cough, current cat ownership, and breast-feeding <2 months were other significant and independent risk factors for asthma.

CONCLUSIONS

Pet ownership markedly increased the risk of sensitization to pets. Despite low allergen exposure, the pattern of childhood asthma in Kuwait follows that described in Western communities (strong association with sensitization).

Authors+Show Affiliations

North West Lung Centre, Wytenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15577842

Citation

Al-Mousawi, Mahdi Sayed Hassan, et al. "Asthma and Sensitization in a Community With Low Indoor Allergen Levels and Low Pet-keeping Frequency." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 114, no. 6, 2004, pp. 1389-94.
Al-Mousawi MS, Lovel H, Behbehani N, et al. Asthma and sensitization in a community with low indoor allergen levels and low pet-keeping frequency. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004;114(6):1389-94.
Al-Mousawi, M. S., Lovel, H., Behbehani, N., Arifhodzic, N., Woodcock, A., & Custovic, A. (2004). Asthma and sensitization in a community with low indoor allergen levels and low pet-keeping frequency. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 114(6), 1389-94.
Al-Mousawi MS, et al. Asthma and Sensitization in a Community With Low Indoor Allergen Levels and Low Pet-keeping Frequency. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004;114(6):1389-94. PubMed PMID: 15577842.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Asthma and sensitization in a community with low indoor allergen levels and low pet-keeping frequency. AU - Al-Mousawi,Mahdi Sayed Hassan, AU - Lovel,Hermione, AU - Behbehani,Nasser, AU - Arifhodzic,Nermina, AU - Woodcock,Ashley, AU - Custovic,Adnan, PY - 2004/12/4/pubmed PY - 2005/1/13/medline PY - 2004/12/4/entrez SP - 1389 EP - 94 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 114 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little is known about causes of asthma and sensitization in desert countries. OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with asthma and sensitization in Kuwait. METHODS: One hundred sixty children (9-16 years) with physician-diagnosed asthma were recruited and matched (age, sex) with 303 healthy controls. Risk factors were assessed by questionnaires, determination of sensitization status (skin tests and IgE), and home allergen exposure (mite, cat, dog, cockroach; ELISA). RESULTS: Home allergen levels and frequency of pet ownership were very low (cat, 4.1%; dog, 1.5%). The risk of cat sensitization increased significantly among cat owners (odds ratio [OR], 3.53; 95% CI, 1.33-9.41; P = .01), and in children with reported contact with cats during the first year of life (OR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.17-5.80; P = .019). In the multivariate analysis, maternal atopy (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.13-2.75; P = .01) and cat ownership (OR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.19-9.25; P = .02) remained significant associates of cat sensitization. Current dog ownership significantly increased the risk of sensitization to dog (OR, 6.05; 95% CI, 1.33-27.54; P = .02). In the multivariate analysis, dog ownership remained the only significant associate of dog sensitization (OR, 6.02; 95% CI, 1.30-27.96; P = .02). Sensitization to Alternaria was the strongest independent associate of the asthma group. Family history of asthma, history of whooping cough, current cat ownership, and breast-feeding <2 months were other significant and independent risk factors for asthma. CONCLUSIONS: Pet ownership markedly increased the risk of sensitization to pets. Despite low allergen exposure, the pattern of childhood asthma in Kuwait follows that described in Western communities (strong association with sensitization). SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15577842/Asthma_and_sensitization_in_a_community_with_low_indoor_allergen_levels_and_low_pet_keeping_frequency_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091674904023966 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -