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Psychological stress and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study.
Cancer Detect Prev 2004; 28(6):399-408CD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether psychological stress, in the form of past life events and stress at work, was associated with the development of breast cancer.

METHODS

The study was based on a case-control study of 257 women with breast cancer operated during 1993-1998 in Szczecin (Poland) hospitals and 565 controls, free of any cancer diagnosis. The subjects were sent a detailed questionnaire including questions on sociodemographic data; lifestyle (lifetime recreational and sport activities, occupational physical activity, diet); reproductive history; experience of psychological stress. The subjects reported major stressful life events, stress of daily activity and experience of stress at work. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS

After adjustment for age and other potential confounders, we found that women with major life events, stress of daily activity, and depression had 3.7 times higher risk for breast cancer, compared to those which did not experience such stress (OR = 3.70; 95% CI, 2.61-5.26). Women who reported experience of stress at work had a nonsignificant 16% higher risk for breast cancer compared with those who reported no stress (OR = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.82-1.64). A higher proportion of cases (89.1%) than controls (71.1%) reported that their job was stressful, very fretful or very responsible or experienced a major life event (OR = 4.29; 95% CI, 2.66-6.92).

CONCLUSION

These findings suggest an association between major life events and breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Physical Education, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Szczecin, Al. Piastów 40b/6, 71-065 Szczecin, Poland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15582263

Citation

Kruk, Joanna, and Hassan Y. Aboul-Enein. "Psychological Stress and the Risk of Breast Cancer: a Case-control Study." Cancer Detection and Prevention, vol. 28, no. 6, 2004, pp. 399-408.
Kruk J, Aboul-Enein HY. Psychological stress and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study. Cancer Detect Prev. 2004;28(6):399-408.
Kruk, J., & Aboul-Enein, H. Y. (2004). Psychological stress and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study. Cancer Detection and Prevention, 28(6), pp. 399-408.
Kruk J, Aboul-Enein HY. Psychological Stress and the Risk of Breast Cancer: a Case-control Study. Cancer Detect Prev. 2004;28(6):399-408. PubMed PMID: 15582263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological stress and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study. AU - Kruk,Joanna, AU - Aboul-Enein,Hassan Y, PY - 2004/07/07/accepted PY - 2004/12/8/pubmed PY - 2005/5/4/medline PY - 2004/12/8/entrez SP - 399 EP - 408 JF - Cancer detection and prevention JO - Cancer Detect. Prev. VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether psychological stress, in the form of past life events and stress at work, was associated with the development of breast cancer. METHODS: The study was based on a case-control study of 257 women with breast cancer operated during 1993-1998 in Szczecin (Poland) hospitals and 565 controls, free of any cancer diagnosis. The subjects were sent a detailed questionnaire including questions on sociodemographic data; lifestyle (lifetime recreational and sport activities, occupational physical activity, diet); reproductive history; experience of psychological stress. The subjects reported major stressful life events, stress of daily activity and experience of stress at work. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: After adjustment for age and other potential confounders, we found that women with major life events, stress of daily activity, and depression had 3.7 times higher risk for breast cancer, compared to those which did not experience such stress (OR = 3.70; 95% CI, 2.61-5.26). Women who reported experience of stress at work had a nonsignificant 16% higher risk for breast cancer compared with those who reported no stress (OR = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.82-1.64). A higher proportion of cases (89.1%) than controls (71.1%) reported that their job was stressful, very fretful or very responsible or experienced a major life event (OR = 4.29; 95% CI, 2.66-6.92). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest an association between major life events and breast cancer. SN - 0361-090X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15582263/Psychological_stress_and_the_risk_of_breast_cancer:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0361-090X(04)00126-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -