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Iron deficiency in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Iron deficiency causes abnormal dopaminergic neurotransmission and may contribute to the physiopathology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate iron deficiency in children with ADHD vs iron deficiency in an age- and sex-matched control group.

DESIGN

Controlled group comparison study.

SETTING

Child and Adolescent Psychopathology Department in European Pediatric Hospital, Paris, France.

PATIENTS

Fifty-three children with ADHD aged 4 to 14 years (mean +/- SD, 9.2 +/- 2.2 years) and 27 controls (mean +/- SD, 9.5 +/- 2.8 years).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Serum ferritin levels evaluating iron stores and Conners' Parent Rating Scale scores measuring severity of ADHD symptoms have been obtained.

RESULTS

The mean serum ferritin levels were lower in the children with ADHD (mean +/- SD, 23 +/- 13 ng/mL) than in the controls (mean +/- SD, 44 +/- 22 ng/mL; P < .001). Serum ferritin levels were abnormal (<30 ng/mL) in 84% of children with ADHD and 18% of controls (P < .001). In addition, low serum ferritin levels were correlated with more severe general ADHD symptoms measured with Conners' Parent Rating Scale (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.34; P < .02) and greater cognitive deficits (r = -0.38; P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that low iron stores contribute to ADHD and that ADHD children may benefit from iron supplementation.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Service de Psychopathologie de l'Enfant et de l'Adolescent, Hôpital Robert Debré, Paris, France. eric.konofal@rdb.ap-hop-paris.fr

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
    Case-Control Studies
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Female
    Ferritins
    Humans
    Iron
    Male

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15583094

    Citation

    Konofal, Eric, et al. "Iron Deficiency in Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 158, no. 12, 2004, pp. 1113-5.
    Konofal E, Lecendreux M, Arnulf I, et al. Iron deficiency in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004;158(12):1113-5.
    Konofal, E., Lecendreux, M., Arnulf, I., & Mouren, M. C. (2004). Iron deficiency in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 158(12), pp. 1113-5.
    Konofal E, et al. Iron Deficiency in Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004;158(12):1113-5. PubMed PMID: 15583094.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Iron deficiency in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. AU - Konofal,Eric, AU - Lecendreux,Michel, AU - Arnulf,Isabelle, AU - Mouren,Marie-Christine, PY - 2004/12/8/pubmed PY - 2004/12/22/medline PY - 2004/12/8/entrez SP - 1113 EP - 5 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 158 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency causes abnormal dopaminergic neurotransmission and may contribute to the physiopathology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate iron deficiency in children with ADHD vs iron deficiency in an age- and sex-matched control group. DESIGN: Controlled group comparison study. SETTING: Child and Adolescent Psychopathology Department in European Pediatric Hospital, Paris, France. PATIENTS: Fifty-three children with ADHD aged 4 to 14 years (mean +/- SD, 9.2 +/- 2.2 years) and 27 controls (mean +/- SD, 9.5 +/- 2.8 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum ferritin levels evaluating iron stores and Conners' Parent Rating Scale scores measuring severity of ADHD symptoms have been obtained. RESULTS: The mean serum ferritin levels were lower in the children with ADHD (mean +/- SD, 23 +/- 13 ng/mL) than in the controls (mean +/- SD, 44 +/- 22 ng/mL; P < .001). Serum ferritin levels were abnormal (<30 ng/mL) in 84% of children with ADHD and 18% of controls (P < .001). In addition, low serum ferritin levels were correlated with more severe general ADHD symptoms measured with Conners' Parent Rating Scale (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.34; P < .02) and greater cognitive deficits (r = -0.38; P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that low iron stores contribute to ADHD and that ADHD children may benefit from iron supplementation. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15583094/Iron_deficiency_in_children_with_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpedi.158.12.1113 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -