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Leading-edge vortex lifts swifts.
Science. 2004 Dec 10; 306(5703):1960-2.Sci

Abstract

The current understanding of how birds fly must be revised, because birds use their hand-wings in an unconventional way to generate lift and drag. Physical models of a common swift wing in gliding posture with a 60 degrees sweep of the sharp hand-wing leading edge were tested in a water tunnel. Interactions with the flow were measured quantitatively with digital particle image velocimetry at Reynolds numbers realistic for the gliding flight of a swift between 3750 and 37,500. The results show that gliding swifts can generate stable leading-edge vortices at small (5 degrees to 10 degrees) angles of attack. We suggest that the flow around the arm-wings of most birds can remain conventionally attached, whereas the swept-back hand-wings generate lift with leading-edge vortices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Marine Biology (Experimental Marine Zoology Group), Groningen University, Post Office Box 14, 9750 AA, Haren, Netherlands. j.j.videler@biol.rug.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15591209

Citation

Videler, J J., et al. "Leading-edge Vortex Lifts Swifts." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 306, no. 5703, 2004, pp. 1960-2.
Videler JJ, Stamhuis EJ, Povel GD. Leading-edge vortex lifts swifts. Science. 2004;306(5703):1960-2.
Videler, J. J., Stamhuis, E. J., & Povel, G. D. (2004). Leading-edge vortex lifts swifts. Science (New York, N.Y.), 306(5703), 1960-2.
Videler JJ, Stamhuis EJ, Povel GD. Leading-edge Vortex Lifts Swifts. Science. 2004 Dec 10;306(5703):1960-2. PubMed PMID: 15591209.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leading-edge vortex lifts swifts. AU - Videler,J J, AU - Stamhuis,E J, AU - Povel,G D E, PY - 2004/12/14/pubmed PY - 2005/1/6/medline PY - 2004/12/14/entrez SP - 1960 EP - 2 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 306 IS - 5703 N2 - The current understanding of how birds fly must be revised, because birds use their hand-wings in an unconventional way to generate lift and drag. Physical models of a common swift wing in gliding posture with a 60 degrees sweep of the sharp hand-wing leading edge were tested in a water tunnel. Interactions with the flow were measured quantitatively with digital particle image velocimetry at Reynolds numbers realistic for the gliding flight of a swift between 3750 and 37,500. The results show that gliding swifts can generate stable leading-edge vortices at small (5 degrees to 10 degrees) angles of attack. We suggest that the flow around the arm-wings of most birds can remain conventionally attached, whereas the swept-back hand-wings generate lift with leading-edge vortices. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15591209/Leading_edge_vortex_lifts_swifts_ L2 - http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15591209 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -