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Severe allergy to sharon fruit caused by birch pollen.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2005 Jan; 136(1):45-52.IA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Allergy to sharon fruit (persimmon) has been only rarely reported. Cross-reactivity with pollen (profilin and Bet v 6) appeared to be involved, but Bet v 1 has not been implicated previously.

OBJECTIVE

It is our aim to identify whether Bet v 1 sensitization is linked to sharon fruit allergy.

METHODS

Two patients with a reaction upon first exposure to sharon fruit were included in the study, as well as 7 patients with birch-pollen-related apple allergy. Sensitivity was assessed by skin prick testing (SPT), a radio-allergosorbent test (RAST) and immunoblotting. RAST analysis was performed for Bet v 1, Bet v 2 and Bet v 6. Cross-reactivity was evaluated by RAST and immunoblot inhibitions. Biological activity of IgE was measured by basophil histamine release. Sharon fruit allergy was evaluated by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) or open challenge (OC).

RESULTS

Both sharon-fruit-allergic patients demonstrated positive reactions in the RAST (8.6 and 6.2 IU/ml, respectively) and SPT (wheal area 37 and 36 mm2). Sharon fruit allergy was confirmed by DBPCFC in 1 patient. The second patient refused a challenge because of the severe initial reaction. Sera from both patients were reactive to Bet v 1 and Bet v 6, which was cross-reactive with sharon fruit by inhibition assays. The patient with the severest reactions was reactive to profilin on immunoblotting. However, profilin did not induce significant histamine release, nor did Bet v 6. Bet v 1 induce approximately 60% histamine release. An OC with sharon fruit in 7 patients allergic to birch pollen and apple, who had not eaten sharon fruit previously, was positive in 6/7 cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Birch-pollen-related allergy to sharon fruit is mediated by the known cross-reactive pollen allergens including Bet v 1 and may become more of a problem should sharon fruit consumption increase.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology/Allergology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. S.Bolhaar@azu.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15591813

Citation

Bolhaar, S T H P., et al. "Severe Allergy to Sharon Fruit Caused By Birch Pollen." International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, vol. 136, no. 1, 2005, pp. 45-52.
Bolhaar ST, van Ree R, Ma Y, et al. Severe allergy to sharon fruit caused by birch pollen. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2005;136(1):45-52.
Bolhaar, S. T., van Ree, R., Ma, Y., Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C. A., Vieths, S., Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K., Knulst, A. C., & Zuidmeer, L. (2005). Severe allergy to sharon fruit caused by birch pollen. International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 136(1), 45-52.
Bolhaar ST, et al. Severe Allergy to Sharon Fruit Caused By Birch Pollen. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2005;136(1):45-52. PubMed PMID: 15591813.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe allergy to sharon fruit caused by birch pollen. AU - Bolhaar,S T H P, AU - van Ree,R, AU - Ma,Y, AU - Bruijnzeel-Koomen,C A F M, AU - Vieths,S, AU - Hoffmann-Sommergruber,K, AU - Knulst,A C, AU - Zuidmeer,L, Y1 - 2004/12/08/ PY - 2004/06/03/received PY - 2004/09/24/accepted PY - 2004/12/14/pubmed PY - 2005/3/4/medline PY - 2004/12/14/entrez SP - 45 EP - 52 JF - International archives of allergy and immunology JO - Int Arch Allergy Immunol VL - 136 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Allergy to sharon fruit (persimmon) has been only rarely reported. Cross-reactivity with pollen (profilin and Bet v 6) appeared to be involved, but Bet v 1 has not been implicated previously. OBJECTIVE: It is our aim to identify whether Bet v 1 sensitization is linked to sharon fruit allergy. METHODS: Two patients with a reaction upon first exposure to sharon fruit were included in the study, as well as 7 patients with birch-pollen-related apple allergy. Sensitivity was assessed by skin prick testing (SPT), a radio-allergosorbent test (RAST) and immunoblotting. RAST analysis was performed for Bet v 1, Bet v 2 and Bet v 6. Cross-reactivity was evaluated by RAST and immunoblot inhibitions. Biological activity of IgE was measured by basophil histamine release. Sharon fruit allergy was evaluated by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) or open challenge (OC). RESULTS: Both sharon-fruit-allergic patients demonstrated positive reactions in the RAST (8.6 and 6.2 IU/ml, respectively) and SPT (wheal area 37 and 36 mm2). Sharon fruit allergy was confirmed by DBPCFC in 1 patient. The second patient refused a challenge because of the severe initial reaction. Sera from both patients were reactive to Bet v 1 and Bet v 6, which was cross-reactive with sharon fruit by inhibition assays. The patient with the severest reactions was reactive to profilin on immunoblotting. However, profilin did not induce significant histamine release, nor did Bet v 6. Bet v 1 induce approximately 60% histamine release. An OC with sharon fruit in 7 patients allergic to birch pollen and apple, who had not eaten sharon fruit previously, was positive in 6/7 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Birch-pollen-related allergy to sharon fruit is mediated by the known cross-reactive pollen allergens including Bet v 1 and may become more of a problem should sharon fruit consumption increase. SN - 1018-2438 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15591813/Severe_allergy_to_sharon_fruit_caused_by_birch_pollen_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000082584 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -