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Impact of obesity and body fat distribution on cardiovascular risk factors in Hong Kong Chinese.
Obes Res. 2004 Nov; 12(11):1805-13.OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Body fat distribution has been reported to differentially contribute to the development of cardiovascular risk. We report the relative associations between general and central obesity and risk factors in 2893 Chinese subjects recruited from the Hong Kong population.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Anthropometric parameters [waist circumference (WC) and BMI], surrogate measures of insulin resistance (fasting plasma glucose and insulin, oral glucose tolerance test, 2 hours glucose and insulin), fasting lipids (total, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured. General obesity was classified as BMI > or =25.0 kg/m(2) and central obesity as a WC > or =80 or > or =90 cm in women and men, respectively.

RESULTS

A total of 39.2% of the population was found to be obese. Obesity per se increased the levels of the risk factors, but central adiposity contributed to a greater extent to adverse high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin resistance levels. There was a continuous relationship between increasing obesity, both general and central, and cardiovascular risk, with lowest risk associated with the lowest indices of obesity. In the 1759 nonobese subjects divided into quartiles of BMI or WC, the levels of the cardiovascular risk factors still significantly increased with increasing quartiles of adiposity.

DISCUSSION

Central adiposity appears to contribute to a greater extent than general adiposity to the development of cardiovascular risk in this population. The relationship between obesity parameters and risk is a continuum, with risk factors significantly increasing even at levels usually considered nonobese. These observations support the proposed redefinition of overweight and obesity in Asian populations using lower cut-off points.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, University of Hong Kong, 21 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15601976

Citation

Thomas, G Neil, et al. "Impact of Obesity and Body Fat Distribution On Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hong Kong Chinese." Obesity Research, vol. 12, no. 11, 2004, pp. 1805-13.
Thomas GN, Ho SY, Lam KS, et al. Impact of obesity and body fat distribution on cardiovascular risk factors in Hong Kong Chinese. Obes Res. 2004;12(11):1805-13.
Thomas, G. N., Ho, S. Y., Lam, K. S., Janus, E. D., Hedley, A. J., & Lam, T. H. (2004). Impact of obesity and body fat distribution on cardiovascular risk factors in Hong Kong Chinese. Obesity Research, 12(11), 1805-13.
Thomas GN, et al. Impact of Obesity and Body Fat Distribution On Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hong Kong Chinese. Obes Res. 2004;12(11):1805-13. PubMed PMID: 15601976.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of obesity and body fat distribution on cardiovascular risk factors in Hong Kong Chinese. AU - Thomas,G Neil, AU - Ho,Sai-Yin, AU - Lam,Karen S L, AU - Janus,Edward D, AU - Hedley,Anthony J, AU - Lam,Tai Hing, AU - ,, PY - 2004/12/17/pubmed PY - 2005/3/18/medline PY - 2004/12/17/entrez SP - 1805 EP - 13 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes Res VL - 12 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Body fat distribution has been reported to differentially contribute to the development of cardiovascular risk. We report the relative associations between general and central obesity and risk factors in 2893 Chinese subjects recruited from the Hong Kong population. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Anthropometric parameters [waist circumference (WC) and BMI], surrogate measures of insulin resistance (fasting plasma glucose and insulin, oral glucose tolerance test, 2 hours glucose and insulin), fasting lipids (total, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured. General obesity was classified as BMI > or =25.0 kg/m(2) and central obesity as a WC > or =80 or > or =90 cm in women and men, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 39.2% of the population was found to be obese. Obesity per se increased the levels of the risk factors, but central adiposity contributed to a greater extent to adverse high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin resistance levels. There was a continuous relationship between increasing obesity, both general and central, and cardiovascular risk, with lowest risk associated with the lowest indices of obesity. In the 1759 nonobese subjects divided into quartiles of BMI or WC, the levels of the cardiovascular risk factors still significantly increased with increasing quartiles of adiposity. DISCUSSION: Central adiposity appears to contribute to a greater extent than general adiposity to the development of cardiovascular risk in this population. The relationship between obesity parameters and risk is a continuum, with risk factors significantly increasing even at levels usually considered nonobese. These observations support the proposed redefinition of overweight and obesity in Asian populations using lower cut-off points. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15601976/Impact_of_obesity_and_body_fat_distribution_on_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_Hong_Kong_Chinese_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2004.224 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -