Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Identified factors in child-dentist relationship important for the management of dental anxiety in Nigerian children.
Eur J Paediatr Dent. 2004 Dec; 5(4):225-32.EJ

Abstract

AIM

To investigate the effects and interrelationship between dental anxiety and dentist's experience, dentist's behaviour, type of treatment received and the behaviour of Nigerian children during treatment.

METHODS

Pre- and post-dental treatment anxiety levels of 69 child patients, who were attending the dental clinic to receive dental treatment for the first time, were assessed using the DFSS-SF. The dentist's and child's behaviour during treatment procedures were unobtrusively observed and recorded. The pre- treatment anxiety levels were classified as high (HAC) and low (LAC), while those of the dentists who managed the children were categorized as experience or inexperienced. The interrelationship between a child's dental anxiety level, dentist's behaviour during child management, dentist's experience and the type of treatment the child received were analysed.

RESULTS

The anxiety level of the children decreased significantly post-treatment when experienced dentists managed the child in comparison to inexperienced dentists (Z=3.22, p<0.02). The dentist's behaviour did not significantly affect the anxiety level of the child. However, physical contact was used more frequently with HAC than LAC (z=2.27;p<0.023). There was no association between a child's behaviour in the dental chair and their anxiety level (chi(2)=0.08, p<0.93). Also, the more invasive the procedure, the less the tendency for a noted decrease in anxiety level of a child post-treatment, though this was statistically insignificant (z=1.34; p<0.44).

CONCLUSION

The dentist's behaviour played no role in changing the anxiety level of a child nor did it have any influence on anxiety-related behaviour of a child. However, the experience of the dentist was a very significant factor for effecting a decrease in the dental anxiety level change for children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Dentistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. mukpong2@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15606321

Citation

Folayan, M O., et al. "Identified Factors in Child-dentist Relationship Important for the Management of Dental Anxiety in Nigerian Children." European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, vol. 5, no. 4, 2004, pp. 225-32.
Folayan MO, Idehen EE, Ojo OO. Identified factors in child-dentist relationship important for the management of dental anxiety in Nigerian children. Eur J Paediatr Dent. 2004;5(4):225-32.
Folayan, M. O., Idehen, E. E., & Ojo, O. O. (2004). Identified factors in child-dentist relationship important for the management of dental anxiety in Nigerian children. European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, 5(4), 225-32.
Folayan MO, Idehen EE, Ojo OO. Identified Factors in Child-dentist Relationship Important for the Management of Dental Anxiety in Nigerian Children. Eur J Paediatr Dent. 2004;5(4):225-32. PubMed PMID: 15606321.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identified factors in child-dentist relationship important for the management of dental anxiety in Nigerian children. AU - Folayan,M O, AU - Idehen,E E, AU - Ojo,O O, PY - 2004/12/21/pubmed PY - 2005/2/5/medline PY - 2004/12/21/entrez SP - 225 EP - 32 JF - European journal of paediatric dentistry JO - Eur J Paediatr Dent VL - 5 IS - 4 N2 - AIM: To investigate the effects and interrelationship between dental anxiety and dentist's experience, dentist's behaviour, type of treatment received and the behaviour of Nigerian children during treatment. METHODS: Pre- and post-dental treatment anxiety levels of 69 child patients, who were attending the dental clinic to receive dental treatment for the first time, were assessed using the DFSS-SF. The dentist's and child's behaviour during treatment procedures were unobtrusively observed and recorded. The pre- treatment anxiety levels were classified as high (HAC) and low (LAC), while those of the dentists who managed the children were categorized as experience or inexperienced. The interrelationship between a child's dental anxiety level, dentist's behaviour during child management, dentist's experience and the type of treatment the child received were analysed. RESULTS: The anxiety level of the children decreased significantly post-treatment when experienced dentists managed the child in comparison to inexperienced dentists (Z=3.22, p<0.02). The dentist's behaviour did not significantly affect the anxiety level of the child. However, physical contact was used more frequently with HAC than LAC (z=2.27;p<0.023). There was no association between a child's behaviour in the dental chair and their anxiety level (chi(2)=0.08, p<0.93). Also, the more invasive the procedure, the less the tendency for a noted decrease in anxiety level of a child post-treatment, though this was statistically insignificant (z=1.34; p<0.44). CONCLUSION: The dentist's behaviour played no role in changing the anxiety level of a child nor did it have any influence on anxiety-related behaviour of a child. However, the experience of the dentist was a very significant factor for effecting a decrease in the dental anxiety level change for children. SN - 1591-996X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15606321/Identified_factors_in_child_dentist_relationship_important_for_the_management_of_dental_anxiety_in_Nigerian_children_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/7698 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -