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[Forbidden anatomy].
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Dec 16; 124(24):3242-4.TN

Abstract

Since centuries anatomists have used any course of action in order to get hold of material for dissections, and at the same time avoid prosecution for grave robbery, at times the only way to get hold of cadavers. Stealing newly dead people from the churchyards and offering them for sale to anatomical institutions was not uncommon in the 19th century. "Resurrectionists"--as these thieves were called, as they made the dead "alive"--were seen as necessary for the teaching of anatomy in Victorian Britain. In the 1820s a scandal was revealed in Scotland, when it was discovered that some people even committed murder to make money from supplying anatomists with human cadavers. Two men, William Burke and William Hare, became particularly notorious because of their "business" with the celebrated anatomist Robert Knox in Edinburgh.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Avdeling for anatomi, Institutt for medisinske basalfag, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1105 Blindern, 0317 Oslo.

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

nor

PubMed ID

15608779

Citation

Holck, Per. "[Forbidden Anatomy]." Tidsskrift for Den Norske Laegeforening : Tidsskrift for Praktisk Medicin, Ny Raekke, vol. 124, no. 24, 2004, pp. 3242-4.
Holck P. [Forbidden anatomy]. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004;124(24):3242-4.
Holck, P. (2004). [Forbidden anatomy]. Tidsskrift for Den Norske Laegeforening : Tidsskrift for Praktisk Medicin, Ny Raekke, 124(24), 3242-4.
Holck P. [Forbidden Anatomy]. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Dec 16;124(24):3242-4. PubMed PMID: 15608779.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Forbidden anatomy]. A1 - Holck,Per, PY - 2004/12/21/pubmed PY - 2005/1/15/medline PY - 2004/12/21/entrez SP - 3242 EP - 4 JF - Tidsskrift for den Norske laegeforening : tidsskrift for praktisk medicin, ny raekke JO - Tidsskr. Nor. Laegeforen. VL - 124 IS - 24 N2 - Since centuries anatomists have used any course of action in order to get hold of material for dissections, and at the same time avoid prosecution for grave robbery, at times the only way to get hold of cadavers. Stealing newly dead people from the churchyards and offering them for sale to anatomical institutions was not uncommon in the 19th century. "Resurrectionists"--as these thieves were called, as they made the dead "alive"--were seen as necessary for the teaching of anatomy in Victorian Britain. In the 1820s a scandal was revealed in Scotland, when it was discovered that some people even committed murder to make money from supplying anatomists with human cadavers. Two men, William Burke and William Hare, became particularly notorious because of their "business" with the celebrated anatomist Robert Knox in Edinburgh. SN - 0807-7096 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15608779/[Forbidden_anatomy]_ L2 - http://tidsskriftet.no/article/1121682 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -