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Predictors of quality of life and pain in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: findings from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study.
BJU Int 2004; 94(9):1279-82BI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the cross-sectional relationship of age, urinary and depressive symptoms and partner status on pain intensity and quality of life (QoL) in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

In all, 463 men enrolled in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study from seven clinical centres (six in the USA and one in Canada) reported baseline screening symptoms using the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI). The CPSI provides scores for pain, urinary symptoms and QoL. In addition, a demographic profile, including age and partner (living with another) status, and a depressive symptom score were obtained. Regression modelling of QoL, adjusting for between-centre variability, examined the unique effects of age, partner status, urological symptoms, depressive symptoms and pain.

RESULTS

Urinary scores, depressive symptoms and pain intensity scores significantly predicted QoL for patients with CP/CPPS (higher CPSI QoL scores indicated more impairment; median 8.0, range 0-12). On average, for every 1-point increase in urinary scores, there was a corresponding increase in QoL score of 0.118 points (P = 0.001); for every 1-point increase in pain intensity score, there was a corresponding increase in QoL score of 0.722 points (P < 0.001); and for every 1-point decrease in depressive symptoms (lower scores equal poorer mood), the QoL score increased (poorer quality of life) by 0.381 points (P < 0.001). Age and partner status did not significantly contribute to poorer QoL. Urinary scores and depressive symptoms were significant predictors (P < 0.001) of pain in patients with CP/CPPS.

CONCLUSIONS

These data show that depressive symptoms and pain intensity significantly predict a poorer QoL in patients with CP/CPPS, and that these effects are independent of partner status, age and urinary status. In particular, pain intensity was the most robust predictor of a poorer QoL. Further data relating pain and psychological factors to CP/CPPS are highly recommended, to aid in determining specific factors for pain and its impact on QoL. These data are essential if empirically guided efforts to manage pain are to progress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. trippd@psyc.queensu.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15610105

Citation

Tripp, Dean A., et al. "Predictors of Quality of Life and Pain in Chronic Prostatitis/chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: Findings From the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study." BJU International, vol. 94, no. 9, 2004, pp. 1279-82.
Tripp DA, Curtis Nickel J, Landis JR, et al. Predictors of quality of life and pain in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: findings from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study. BJU Int. 2004;94(9):1279-82.
Tripp, D. A., Curtis Nickel, J., Landis, J. R., Wang, Y. L., & Knauss, J. S. (2004). Predictors of quality of life and pain in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: findings from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study. BJU International, 94(9), pp. 1279-82.
Tripp DA, et al. Predictors of Quality of Life and Pain in Chronic Prostatitis/chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: Findings From the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study. BJU Int. 2004;94(9):1279-82. PubMed PMID: 15610105.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictors of quality of life and pain in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: findings from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study. AU - Tripp,Dean A, AU - Curtis Nickel,J, AU - Landis,J Richard, AU - Wang,Yan Lin, AU - Knauss,Jill S, AU - ,, PY - 2004/12/22/pubmed PY - 2005/2/3/medline PY - 2004/12/22/entrez SP - 1279 EP - 82 JF - BJU international JO - BJU Int. VL - 94 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the cross-sectional relationship of age, urinary and depressive symptoms and partner status on pain intensity and quality of life (QoL) in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). PATIENTS AND METHODS: In all, 463 men enrolled in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study from seven clinical centres (six in the USA and one in Canada) reported baseline screening symptoms using the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI). The CPSI provides scores for pain, urinary symptoms and QoL. In addition, a demographic profile, including age and partner (living with another) status, and a depressive symptom score were obtained. Regression modelling of QoL, adjusting for between-centre variability, examined the unique effects of age, partner status, urological symptoms, depressive symptoms and pain. RESULTS: Urinary scores, depressive symptoms and pain intensity scores significantly predicted QoL for patients with CP/CPPS (higher CPSI QoL scores indicated more impairment; median 8.0, range 0-12). On average, for every 1-point increase in urinary scores, there was a corresponding increase in QoL score of 0.118 points (P = 0.001); for every 1-point increase in pain intensity score, there was a corresponding increase in QoL score of 0.722 points (P < 0.001); and for every 1-point decrease in depressive symptoms (lower scores equal poorer mood), the QoL score increased (poorer quality of life) by 0.381 points (P < 0.001). Age and partner status did not significantly contribute to poorer QoL. Urinary scores and depressive symptoms were significant predictors (P < 0.001) of pain in patients with CP/CPPS. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that depressive symptoms and pain intensity significantly predict a poorer QoL in patients with CP/CPPS, and that these effects are independent of partner status, age and urinary status. In particular, pain intensity was the most robust predictor of a poorer QoL. Further data relating pain and psychological factors to CP/CPPS are highly recommended, to aid in determining specific factors for pain and its impact on QoL. These data are essential if empirically guided efforts to manage pain are to progress. SN - 1464-4096 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15610105/Predictors_of_quality_of_life_and_pain_in_chronic_prostatitis/chronic_pelvic_pain_syndrome:_findings_from_the_National_Institutes_of_Health_Chronic_Prostatitis_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2004.05157.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -