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Multiple myeloma and contrast media.
Radiology 1992; 183(2):519-21R

Abstract

Contrast media administered intravenously are still thought by many to be a major cause of acute renal failure (ARF) in myeloma patients. Recently, several authors found that the predominant risk factors of ARF in myeloma patients are hypercalcemia, dehydration, infection, and Bence Jones proteinuria rather than contrast media. In a review of seven retrospective studies of myeloma patients receiving contrast media, 476 patients were noted to have undergone 568 contrast media studies, with an ARF prevalence of 0.6%-1.25%. One large series showed the incidence of ARF after administration of contrast media to be 0.15% in the general population. Although the administration of contrast media to myeloma patients is not totally risk free, it may be performed if the clinical need arises and the patient is well hydrated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Health Science Center at Brooklyn 11203.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1561361

Citation

McCarthy, C S., and J A. Becker. "Multiple Myeloma and Contrast Media." Radiology, vol. 183, no. 2, 1992, pp. 519-21.
McCarthy CS, Becker JA. Multiple myeloma and contrast media. Radiology. 1992;183(2):519-21.
McCarthy, C. S., & Becker, J. A. (1992). Multiple myeloma and contrast media. Radiology, 183(2), pp. 519-21.
McCarthy CS, Becker JA. Multiple Myeloma and Contrast Media. Radiology. 1992;183(2):519-21. PubMed PMID: 1561361.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multiple myeloma and contrast media. AU - McCarthy,C S, AU - Becker,J A, PY - 1992/5/1/pubmed PY - 1992/5/1/medline PY - 1992/5/1/entrez SP - 519 EP - 21 JF - Radiology JO - Radiology VL - 183 IS - 2 N2 - Contrast media administered intravenously are still thought by many to be a major cause of acute renal failure (ARF) in myeloma patients. Recently, several authors found that the predominant risk factors of ARF in myeloma patients are hypercalcemia, dehydration, infection, and Bence Jones proteinuria rather than contrast media. In a review of seven retrospective studies of myeloma patients receiving contrast media, 476 patients were noted to have undergone 568 contrast media studies, with an ARF prevalence of 0.6%-1.25%. One large series showed the incidence of ARF after administration of contrast media to be 0.15% in the general population. Although the administration of contrast media to myeloma patients is not totally risk free, it may be performed if the clinical need arises and the patient is well hydrated. SN - 0033-8419 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1561361/Multiple_myeloma_and_contrast_media_ L2 - http://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/radiology.183.2.1561361?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -