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Emotions in everyday life: an ambulatory monitoring study with female students.
Biol Psychol. 2005 Mar; 68(3):237-55.BP

Abstract

Additional heart rate as an indicator of emotional arousal was monitored throughout the day with a special ambulatory device. Fifty female students received acoustic feedback every 10-20 min. The feedback was based either on events (additional heart rate present) or was random without additional heart rate. Following the feedback the subjects were asked to disclose their emotions. The following emotions were listed on the display of the monitoring device: no emotion, happiness, anger, anxiety/fear, sadness, surprise, and disgust. The frequency and quality of the emotions were not different between event-related and random feedbacks, indicating that the subjects were not able to discriminate between events with and without additional heart rate correctly. Accordingly, the physiological profiles of the differing emotions compared to conditions with "no emotion" were equivocal. The psychological ratings of excitement and enjoyment, however, came up to expectations. The results show that cognitive schemata and personality dimensions are more important in emotion perception than physiological activation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Forschungsgruppe Psychophysiologie, Institut für Psychologie, Universität Freiburg, Belfortstr. 20, D-Freiburg 79085, Germany. myrtek@psychologie.uni-freiburg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15620793

Citation

Myrtek, Michael, et al. "Emotions in Everyday Life: an Ambulatory Monitoring Study With Female Students." Biological Psychology, vol. 68, no. 3, 2005, pp. 237-55.
Myrtek M, Aschenbrenner E, Brügner G, et al. Emotions in everyday life: an ambulatory monitoring study with female students. Biol Psychol. 2005;68(3):237-55.
Myrtek, M., Aschenbrenner, E., & Brügner, G. (2005). Emotions in everyday life: an ambulatory monitoring study with female students. Biological Psychology, 68(3), 237-55.
Myrtek M, et al. Emotions in Everyday Life: an Ambulatory Monitoring Study With Female Students. Biol Psychol. 2005;68(3):237-55. PubMed PMID: 15620793.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emotions in everyday life: an ambulatory monitoring study with female students. AU - Myrtek,Michael, AU - Aschenbrenner,Eveline, AU - Brügner,Georg, AU - ,, PY - 2004/06/10/received PY - 2004/06/10/accepted PY - 2004/12/29/pubmed PY - 2005/5/11/medline PY - 2004/12/29/entrez SP - 237 EP - 55 JF - Biological psychology JO - Biol Psychol VL - 68 IS - 3 N2 - Additional heart rate as an indicator of emotional arousal was monitored throughout the day with a special ambulatory device. Fifty female students received acoustic feedback every 10-20 min. The feedback was based either on events (additional heart rate present) or was random without additional heart rate. Following the feedback the subjects were asked to disclose their emotions. The following emotions were listed on the display of the monitoring device: no emotion, happiness, anger, anxiety/fear, sadness, surprise, and disgust. The frequency and quality of the emotions were not different between event-related and random feedbacks, indicating that the subjects were not able to discriminate between events with and without additional heart rate correctly. Accordingly, the physiological profiles of the differing emotions compared to conditions with "no emotion" were equivocal. The psychological ratings of excitement and enjoyment, however, came up to expectations. The results show that cognitive schemata and personality dimensions are more important in emotion perception than physiological activation. SN - 0301-0511 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15620793/Emotions_in_everyday_life:_an_ambulatory_monitoring_study_with_female_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301051104001036 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -