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Ciguatera fish poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers: a retrospective study in a seaport general practice in Trinidad and Tobago.
West Indian Med J. 2004 Sep; 53(4):220-6.WI

Abstract

The objective of this study was to outline the epidemiology of Ciguatera fish poisoning as seen in a general practice serving two industrial seaports in Trinidad and Tobago, in order to highlight the potential public health implications. A retrospective study was undertaken of all the cases of Ciguatera fish poisoning identified between November 1, 1992 and October 31, 1998 in a seaport general practice to identify signs, symptoms and treatment. An investigation of one outbreak was undertaken. Four outbreaks affecting 42 male ship crewmembers were identified. The suspect fish were caught in northern Caribbean waters en route to Trinidad and Tobago. The most common early symptoms were diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, pruritus and tiredness. In the third outbreak, dysaesthesia was common. Progression to muscular weakness, ataxic gait, unsteadiness and other neurotoxic signs were seen in moderate to severe disease. Hypotension was an important prognostic sign in the initial case. Treatment was symptomatic and supportive and included vitamins B12 and BCO, folic acid, prostigmine, steroids and antihistamines as indicated. In the investigation of the second outbreak, the relative risk of 'eating fish meat' was 5 (95% CI 1.45, 17.27, p < 0.0001). Abdominal symptoms, pruritus, and muscle weakness with a history of consuming a fish-meal were diagnostic indicators of 'ciguatera fish poisoning.' All cases were industrial ship crewmembers. It is suggested that increased clinician awareness with early and appropriate treatment, and focussed public health intervention may help limit the potential public health impact of ciguatera poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers and other fish-consuming communities in the future.

Authors+Show Affiliations

General Practice Services, San Fernando, Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15622674

Citation

Poon-King, C M., et al. "Ciguatera Fish Poisoning in Industrial Ship Crewmembers: a Retrospective Study in a Seaport General Practice in Trinidad and Tobago." The West Indian Medical Journal, vol. 53, no. 4, 2004, pp. 220-6.
Poon-King CM, Chen A, Poon-King T. Ciguatera fish poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers: a retrospective study in a seaport general practice in Trinidad and Tobago. West Indian Med J. 2004;53(4):220-6.
Poon-King, C. M., Chen, A., & Poon-King, T. (2004). Ciguatera fish poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers: a retrospective study in a seaport general practice in Trinidad and Tobago. The West Indian Medical Journal, 53(4), 220-6.
Poon-King CM, Chen A, Poon-King T. Ciguatera Fish Poisoning in Industrial Ship Crewmembers: a Retrospective Study in a Seaport General Practice in Trinidad and Tobago. West Indian Med J. 2004;53(4):220-6. PubMed PMID: 15622674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ciguatera fish poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers: a retrospective study in a seaport general practice in Trinidad and Tobago. AU - Poon-King,C M, AU - Chen,A, AU - Poon-King,T, PY - 2004/12/30/pubmed PY - 2005/1/26/medline PY - 2004/12/30/entrez SP - 220 EP - 6 JF - The West Indian medical journal JO - West Indian Med J VL - 53 IS - 4 N2 - The objective of this study was to outline the epidemiology of Ciguatera fish poisoning as seen in a general practice serving two industrial seaports in Trinidad and Tobago, in order to highlight the potential public health implications. A retrospective study was undertaken of all the cases of Ciguatera fish poisoning identified between November 1, 1992 and October 31, 1998 in a seaport general practice to identify signs, symptoms and treatment. An investigation of one outbreak was undertaken. Four outbreaks affecting 42 male ship crewmembers were identified. The suspect fish were caught in northern Caribbean waters en route to Trinidad and Tobago. The most common early symptoms were diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, pruritus and tiredness. In the third outbreak, dysaesthesia was common. Progression to muscular weakness, ataxic gait, unsteadiness and other neurotoxic signs were seen in moderate to severe disease. Hypotension was an important prognostic sign in the initial case. Treatment was symptomatic and supportive and included vitamins B12 and BCO, folic acid, prostigmine, steroids and antihistamines as indicated. In the investigation of the second outbreak, the relative risk of 'eating fish meat' was 5 (95% CI 1.45, 17.27, p < 0.0001). Abdominal symptoms, pruritus, and muscle weakness with a history of consuming a fish-meal were diagnostic indicators of 'ciguatera fish poisoning.' All cases were industrial ship crewmembers. It is suggested that increased clinician awareness with early and appropriate treatment, and focussed public health intervention may help limit the potential public health impact of ciguatera poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers and other fish-consuming communities in the future. SN - 0043-3144 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15622674/Ciguatera_fish_poisoning_in_industrial_ship_crewmembers:_a_retrospective_study_in_a_seaport_general_practice_in_Trinidad_and_Tobago_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/1638 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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