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The impact of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor on disease progression after prostatectomy.
Cancer. 2005 Feb 01; 103(3):528-37.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The authors examined the impact of the number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor on disease progression among men with prostate carcinoma after prostatectomy. This polymorphism has been associated with alterations in activity of the androgen receptor in in vitro systems and with the risk of clinically diagnosed prostate carcinoma in some epidemiologic studies. An earlier series found that, among men at low risk of progressive disease, a small number of CAG repeats predicted a high risk of recurrence, and the impact of CAG repeats varied among men with different risks of progressive disease.

METHODS

The authors analyzed specimens from a large clinical series of fixed tissue specimens from men who underwent prostatectomy at a single institution, including 413 American white men (WM) and 298 African-American men (AAM), with 5-10 years of available clinical follow-up.

RESULTS

There was little association between the number of CAG repeats and extent of disease, Gleason score, and preoperative PSA level at diagnosis. Overall, patients who had > 18 CAG repeats had a greater risk of recurrence compared with patients who had </= 18 CAG repeats (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.52; P = 0.03). Excess risk was not found among men who were at low risk of recurrence (HR = 0.93; P = 0.96); however, among men who were at high risk of recurrence, the risk elevated for WM (HR = 1.75; P = 0.28), AAM (HR = 1.49; P = 0.06), and both races combined (HR = 1.53; P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, men with prostate carcinoma who had > 18 CAG repeats had an estimated 52% increased risk of disease recurrence. The increased risk could be attributed to men who were at high risk of recurrence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15630701

Citation

Powell, Isaac J., et al. "The Impact of CAG Repeats in Exon 1 of the Androgen Receptor On Disease Progression After Prostatectomy." Cancer, vol. 103, no. 3, 2005, pp. 528-37.
Powell IJ, Land SJ, Dey J, et al. The impact of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor on disease progression after prostatectomy. Cancer. 2005;103(3):528-37.
Powell, I. J., Land, S. J., Dey, J., Heilbrun, L. K., Hughes, M. R., Sakr, W., & Everson, R. B. (2005). The impact of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor on disease progression after prostatectomy. Cancer, 103(3), 528-37.
Powell IJ, et al. The Impact of CAG Repeats in Exon 1 of the Androgen Receptor On Disease Progression After Prostatectomy. Cancer. 2005 Feb 1;103(3):528-37. PubMed PMID: 15630701.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor on disease progression after prostatectomy. AU - Powell,Isaac J, AU - Land,Susan J, AU - Dey,Jyotirmoy, AU - Heilbrun,Lance K, AU - Hughes,Mark R, AU - Sakr,Wael, AU - Everson,Richard B, PY - 2005/1/5/pubmed PY - 2005/2/23/medline PY - 2005/1/5/entrez SP - 528 EP - 37 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 103 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The authors examined the impact of the number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor on disease progression among men with prostate carcinoma after prostatectomy. This polymorphism has been associated with alterations in activity of the androgen receptor in in vitro systems and with the risk of clinically diagnosed prostate carcinoma in some epidemiologic studies. An earlier series found that, among men at low risk of progressive disease, a small number of CAG repeats predicted a high risk of recurrence, and the impact of CAG repeats varied among men with different risks of progressive disease. METHODS: The authors analyzed specimens from a large clinical series of fixed tissue specimens from men who underwent prostatectomy at a single institution, including 413 American white men (WM) and 298 African-American men (AAM), with 5-10 years of available clinical follow-up. RESULTS: There was little association between the number of CAG repeats and extent of disease, Gleason score, and preoperative PSA level at diagnosis. Overall, patients who had > 18 CAG repeats had a greater risk of recurrence compared with patients who had </= 18 CAG repeats (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.52; P = 0.03). Excess risk was not found among men who were at low risk of recurrence (HR = 0.93; P = 0.96); however, among men who were at high risk of recurrence, the risk elevated for WM (HR = 1.75; P = 0.28), AAM (HR = 1.49; P = 0.06), and both races combined (HR = 1.53; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, men with prostate carcinoma who had > 18 CAG repeats had an estimated 52% increased risk of disease recurrence. The increased risk could be attributed to men who were at high risk of recurrence. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15630701/The_impact_of_CAG_repeats_in_exon_1_of_the_androgen_receptor_on_disease_progression_after_prostatectomy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20788 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -