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Intergroup contact and pluralistic ignorance.
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2005 Jan; 88(1):91-107.JP

Abstract

The present work examined the relationship between people's own interpretations of why they avoid intergroup contact and their interpretations of why out-groups avoid intergroup contact. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that Whites and Blacks would like to have more contact with the out-group but believe the out-group does not want to have contact with them. Studies 3-5 show that Whites and Blacks make divergent explanations about their own and their potential out-group partner's failure to initiate contact. Specifically, individuals explained their own inaction in terms of their fear of being rejected because of their race but attributed the out-group members' inaction to their lack of interest. Study 6 examined the behavioral consequences of this self-other bias. Finally, Study 7 applied theoretical work on the extended contact hypothesis to explore a means to reduce this self- other bias. The implications of these studies for improving intergroup interactions are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA. nshelton@princeton.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15631577

Citation

Shelton, J Nicole, and Jennifer A. Richeson. "Intergroup Contact and Pluralistic Ignorance." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 88, no. 1, 2005, pp. 91-107.
Shelton JN, Richeson JA. Intergroup contact and pluralistic ignorance. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2005;88(1):91-107.
Shelton, J. N., & Richeson, J. A. (2005). Intergroup contact and pluralistic ignorance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88(1), 91-107.
Shelton JN, Richeson JA. Intergroup Contact and Pluralistic Ignorance. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2005;88(1):91-107. PubMed PMID: 15631577.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intergroup contact and pluralistic ignorance. AU - Shelton,J Nicole, AU - Richeson,Jennifer A, PY - 2005/1/6/pubmed PY - 2005/6/3/medline PY - 2005/1/6/entrez SP - 91 EP - 107 JF - Journal of personality and social psychology JO - J Pers Soc Psychol VL - 88 IS - 1 N2 - The present work examined the relationship between people's own interpretations of why they avoid intergroup contact and their interpretations of why out-groups avoid intergroup contact. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that Whites and Blacks would like to have more contact with the out-group but believe the out-group does not want to have contact with them. Studies 3-5 show that Whites and Blacks make divergent explanations about their own and their potential out-group partner's failure to initiate contact. Specifically, individuals explained their own inaction in terms of their fear of being rejected because of their race but attributed the out-group members' inaction to their lack of interest. Study 6 examined the behavioral consequences of this self-other bias. Finally, Study 7 applied theoretical work on the extended contact hypothesis to explore a means to reduce this self- other bias. The implications of these studies for improving intergroup interactions are discussed. SN - 0022-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15631577/Intergroup_contact_and_pluralistic_ignorance_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/psp/88/1/91 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -