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Community acquired respiratory viral infections after lung transplantation: clinical features and long-term consequences.
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2004 Winter; 16(4):342-9.ST

Abstract

Community acquired respiratory viruses (CARVs) are increasingly recognized as serious threats to lung transplant recipients. While CARVs such as respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, influenza, and adenovirus usually cause self-limited illnesses in immunocompetent subjects, infections in the transplant recipient can be dramatic. As transplant recipients live longer and diagnostic methods improve, the burden of CARVs will undoubtedly increase. Because of limited therapeutic options, some patients may succumb to CARV infections, while many survivors develop chronic allograft dysfunction. Recognition of this latter phenomenon has implicated CARVs in the pathogenesis of bronchiolitis obliterans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. chakinalam@wustl.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15635538

Citation

Chakinala, Murali M., and Michael J. Walter. "Community Acquired Respiratory Viral Infections After Lung Transplantation: Clinical Features and Long-term Consequences." Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 16, no. 4, 2004, pp. 342-9.
Chakinala MM, Walter MJ. Community acquired respiratory viral infections after lung transplantation: clinical features and long-term consequences. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2004;16(4):342-9.
Chakinala, M. M., & Walter, M. J. (2004). Community acquired respiratory viral infections after lung transplantation: clinical features and long-term consequences. Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 16(4), 342-9.
Chakinala MM, Walter MJ. Community Acquired Respiratory Viral Infections After Lung Transplantation: Clinical Features and Long-term Consequences. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2004;16(4):342-9. PubMed PMID: 15635538.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Community acquired respiratory viral infections after lung transplantation: clinical features and long-term consequences. AU - Chakinala,Murali M, AU - Walter,Michael J, PY - 2005/1/7/pubmed PY - 2005/6/29/medline PY - 2005/1/7/entrez SP - 342 EP - 9 JF - Seminars in thoracic and cardiovascular surgery JO - Semin. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg. VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - Community acquired respiratory viruses (CARVs) are increasingly recognized as serious threats to lung transplant recipients. While CARVs such as respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, influenza, and adenovirus usually cause self-limited illnesses in immunocompetent subjects, infections in the transplant recipient can be dramatic. As transplant recipients live longer and diagnostic methods improve, the burden of CARVs will undoubtedly increase. Because of limited therapeutic options, some patients may succumb to CARV infections, while many survivors develop chronic allograft dysfunction. Recognition of this latter phenomenon has implicated CARVs in the pathogenesis of bronchiolitis obliterans. SN - 1043-0679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15635538/Community_acquired_respiratory_viral_infections_after_lung_transplantation:_clinical_features_and_long_term_consequences_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1043067904000796 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -