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The epidemiologic study of dementia: a life-long quest?

Abstract

Based on many experimental and observational studies we now understand that neurodegenerative brain changes begin by middle age. Characteristics of the risk factors for these brain changes may also change with age. A review is conducted of studies that report on the association of mid-life risk factors to late cognitive impairment and dementia. Issues related to the interpretation of the data are discussed. The studies suggest that mid-life cardiovascular risk factors, and in particular elevated levels of blood pressure, increase the risk for late-life cognitive impairment and dementia. Our understanding the contribution of cardiovascular risk factors to late age brain disease has been helped tremendously by prospective studies with long follow-up. To better understand which risk factors lead to disease initiation, progression and prognosis, a life course approach to the epidemiologic study of dementia is needed.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, Biometry, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. launerl@nia.nih.gov

    Source

    Neurobiology of aging 26:3 2005 Mar pg 335-40

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aging
    Blood Pressure
    Brain
    Cholesterol
    Cognition Disorders
    Comorbidity
    Dementia
    Epidemiologic Methods
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15639311

    Citation

    Launer, L J.. "The Epidemiologic Study of Dementia: a Life-long Quest?" Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 26, no. 3, 2005, pp. 335-40.
    Launer LJ. The epidemiologic study of dementia: a life-long quest? Neurobiol Aging. 2005;26(3):335-40.
    Launer, L. J. (2005). The epidemiologic study of dementia: a life-long quest? Neurobiology of Aging, 26(3), pp. 335-40.
    Launer LJ. The Epidemiologic Study of Dementia: a Life-long Quest. Neurobiol Aging. 2005;26(3):335-40. PubMed PMID: 15639311.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The epidemiologic study of dementia: a life-long quest? A1 - Launer,L J, PY - 2004/01/15/received PY - 2004/03/13/revised PY - 2004/03/30/accepted PY - 2005/1/11/pubmed PY - 2005/4/20/medline PY - 2005/1/11/entrez SP - 335 EP - 40 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol. Aging VL - 26 IS - 3 N2 - Based on many experimental and observational studies we now understand that neurodegenerative brain changes begin by middle age. Characteristics of the risk factors for these brain changes may also change with age. A review is conducted of studies that report on the association of mid-life risk factors to late cognitive impairment and dementia. Issues related to the interpretation of the data are discussed. The studies suggest that mid-life cardiovascular risk factors, and in particular elevated levels of blood pressure, increase the risk for late-life cognitive impairment and dementia. Our understanding the contribution of cardiovascular risk factors to late age brain disease has been helped tremendously by prospective studies with long follow-up. To better understand which risk factors lead to disease initiation, progression and prognosis, a life course approach to the epidemiologic study of dementia is needed. SN - 0197-4580 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15639311/The_epidemiologic_study_of_dementia:_a_life_long_quest L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(04)00268-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -