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Pesticides and risk of Parkinson disease: a population-based case-control study.
Arch Neurol 2005; 62(1):91-5AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pesticide exposures are suspected risk factors for Parkinson disease (PD), but epidemiological observations have been inconsistent.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate associations between pesticide exposures and idiopathic PD.

DESIGN

Population-based case-control study.

SETTING

Group Health Cooperative, a health care system in western Washington State, and the University of Washington.

PARTICIPANTS

Two hundred fifty incident PD case patients and 388 healthy control subjects (age- and sex-matched). We assessed self-reported pesticide exposures using a structured interview. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using logistic regression models, controlling for age, sex, and smoking.

RESULTS

Odds ratios for occupational exposures were not significant but suggested a gradient that paralleled occupational exposures (pesticide worker: OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 0.67-6.38; crop farmer: OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 0.84-3.27; animal and crop farmer: OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.60-2.00; and dairy farmer: OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.46-1.70). Odds ratios for organophosphates paralleled the World Health Organization hazard classifications, with parathion much higher than diazinon or malathion. We also found elevated ORs from herbicides (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.51-3.88) and paraquat (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 0.22-12.76). We found no evidence of risk from home-based pesticide exposures. We found significantly increased ORs from lifelong well water consumption (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.02-3.21).

CONCLUSIONS

The findings for occupational pesticide exposures are consistent with a growing body of information linking pesticide exposures with PD. However, the lack of significant associations, absence of associations with home-based exposures, and weak associations with rural exposures suggest that pesticides did not play a substantial etiologic role in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, University of Washington, PO Box 359739, Seattle, WA 98104, USA. jfire@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15642854

Citation

Firestone, Jordan A., et al. "Pesticides and Risk of Parkinson Disease: a Population-based Case-control Study." Archives of Neurology, vol. 62, no. 1, 2005, pp. 91-5.
Firestone JA, Smith-Weller T, Franklin G, et al. Pesticides and risk of Parkinson disease: a population-based case-control study. Arch Neurol. 2005;62(1):91-5.
Firestone, J. A., Smith-Weller, T., Franklin, G., Swanson, P., Longstreth, W. T., & Checkoway, H. (2005). Pesticides and risk of Parkinson disease: a population-based case-control study. Archives of Neurology, 62(1), pp. 91-5.
Firestone JA, et al. Pesticides and Risk of Parkinson Disease: a Population-based Case-control Study. Arch Neurol. 2005;62(1):91-5. PubMed PMID: 15642854.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pesticides and risk of Parkinson disease: a population-based case-control study. AU - Firestone,Jordan A, AU - Smith-Weller,Terri, AU - Franklin,Gary, AU - Swanson,Phillip, AU - Longstreth,W T,Jr AU - Checkoway,Harvey, PY - 2005/1/12/pubmed PY - 2005/3/8/medline PY - 2005/1/12/entrez SP - 91 EP - 5 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch. Neurol. VL - 62 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pesticide exposures are suspected risk factors for Parkinson disease (PD), but epidemiological observations have been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between pesticide exposures and idiopathic PD. DESIGN: Population-based case-control study. SETTING: Group Health Cooperative, a health care system in western Washington State, and the University of Washington. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred fifty incident PD case patients and 388 healthy control subjects (age- and sex-matched). We assessed self-reported pesticide exposures using a structured interview. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using logistic regression models, controlling for age, sex, and smoking. RESULTS: Odds ratios for occupational exposures were not significant but suggested a gradient that paralleled occupational exposures (pesticide worker: OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 0.67-6.38; crop farmer: OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 0.84-3.27; animal and crop farmer: OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.60-2.00; and dairy farmer: OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.46-1.70). Odds ratios for organophosphates paralleled the World Health Organization hazard classifications, with parathion much higher than diazinon or malathion. We also found elevated ORs from herbicides (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.51-3.88) and paraquat (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 0.22-12.76). We found no evidence of risk from home-based pesticide exposures. We found significantly increased ORs from lifelong well water consumption (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.02-3.21). CONCLUSIONS: The findings for occupational pesticide exposures are consistent with a growing body of information linking pesticide exposures with PD. However, the lack of significant associations, absence of associations with home-based exposures, and weak associations with rural exposures suggest that pesticides did not play a substantial etiologic role in this population. SN - 0003-9942 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15642854/Pesticides_and_risk_of_Parkinson_disease:_a_population_based_case_control_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/10.1001/archneur.62.1.91 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -