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Bone loss and fracture risk after reduced physical activity.
J Bone Miner Res. 2005 Feb; 20(2):202-7.JB

Abstract

Former male young athletes partially lost benefits in BMD (g/cm2) with cessation of exercise, but, despite this, had a higher BMD 4 years after cessation of career than a control group. A higher BMD might contribute to the lower incidence of fragility fractures found in former older athletes > or =60 years of age compared with a control group.

INTRODUCTION

Physical activity increases peak bone mass and may prevent osteoporosis if a residual high BMD is retained into old age.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

BMD was measured by DXA in 97 male young athletes 21.0 +/- 4.5 years of age (SD) and 48 controls 22.4 +/- 6.3 years of age, with measurements repeated 5 years later, when 55 of the athletes had retired from sports. In a second, older cohort, fracture incidence was recorded in 400 former older athletes and 800 controls > or =60 years of age.

RESULTS

At baseline, the young athletes had higher BMD than controls in total body (mean difference, 0.08 g/cm2), spine (mean difference, 0.10 g/cm2), femoral neck (mean difference, 0.13 g/cm2), and arms (mean difference, 0.05 g/cm2; all p < 0.001). During the follow-up period, the young athletes who retired lost more BMD than the still active athletes at the femoral neck (mean difference, 0.07 g/cm2; p = 0.001) and gained less BMD at the total body (mean difference, 0.03 g/cm2; p = 0.004). Nevertheless, BMD was still higher in the retired young athletes (mean difference, 0.06-0.08 g/cm2) than in the controls in the total body, femoral neck, and arms (all p < 0.05). In the older cohort, there were fewer former athletes > or =60 of age than controls with fragility fractures (2.0% versus 4.2%; p < 0.05) and distal radius fractures (0.75% versus 2.5%; p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Although exercise-induced BMD benefits are reduced after retirement from sports, former male older athletes have fewer fractures than matched controls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, University of Umeö, Umeö, Sweden. anna.nordstrom@idrott.umu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15647813

Citation

Nordström, Anna, et al. "Bone Loss and Fracture Risk After Reduced Physical Activity." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 20, no. 2, 2005, pp. 202-7.
Nordström A, Karlsson C, Nyquist F, et al. Bone loss and fracture risk after reduced physical activity. J Bone Miner Res. 2005;20(2):202-7.
Nordström, A., Karlsson, C., Nyquist, F., Olsson, T., Nordström, P., & Karlsson, M. (2005). Bone loss and fracture risk after reduced physical activity. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 20(2), 202-7.
Nordström A, et al. Bone Loss and Fracture Risk After Reduced Physical Activity. J Bone Miner Res. 2005;20(2):202-7. PubMed PMID: 15647813.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bone loss and fracture risk after reduced physical activity. AU - Nordström,Anna, AU - Karlsson,Caroline, AU - Nyquist,Fredrik, AU - Olsson,Tommy, AU - Nordström,Peter, AU - Karlsson,Magnus, Y1 - 2004/10/18/ PY - 2004/03/29/received PY - 2004/07/05/revised PY - 2004/08/31/accepted PY - 2005/1/14/pubmed PY - 2005/6/9/medline PY - 2005/1/14/entrez SP - 202 EP - 7 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J Bone Miner Res VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - UNLABELLED: Former male young athletes partially lost benefits in BMD (g/cm2) with cessation of exercise, but, despite this, had a higher BMD 4 years after cessation of career than a control group. A higher BMD might contribute to the lower incidence of fragility fractures found in former older athletes > or =60 years of age compared with a control group. INTRODUCTION: Physical activity increases peak bone mass and may prevent osteoporosis if a residual high BMD is retained into old age. MATERIALS AND METHODS: BMD was measured by DXA in 97 male young athletes 21.0 +/- 4.5 years of age (SD) and 48 controls 22.4 +/- 6.3 years of age, with measurements repeated 5 years later, when 55 of the athletes had retired from sports. In a second, older cohort, fracture incidence was recorded in 400 former older athletes and 800 controls > or =60 years of age. RESULTS: At baseline, the young athletes had higher BMD than controls in total body (mean difference, 0.08 g/cm2), spine (mean difference, 0.10 g/cm2), femoral neck (mean difference, 0.13 g/cm2), and arms (mean difference, 0.05 g/cm2; all p < 0.001). During the follow-up period, the young athletes who retired lost more BMD than the still active athletes at the femoral neck (mean difference, 0.07 g/cm2; p = 0.001) and gained less BMD at the total body (mean difference, 0.03 g/cm2; p = 0.004). Nevertheless, BMD was still higher in the retired young athletes (mean difference, 0.06-0.08 g/cm2) than in the controls in the total body, femoral neck, and arms (all p < 0.05). In the older cohort, there were fewer former athletes > or =60 of age than controls with fragility fractures (2.0% versus 4.2%; p < 0.05) and distal radius fractures (0.75% versus 2.5%; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Although exercise-induced BMD benefits are reduced after retirement from sports, former male older athletes have fewer fractures than matched controls. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15647813/Bone_loss_and_fracture_risk_after_reduced_physical_activity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.041012 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -