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Prenatal paracetamol exposure and risk of asthma and elevated immunoglobulin E in childhood.
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Jan; 35(1):18-25.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We recently found that paracetamol (acetaminophen) use in late pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of early wheezing in the offspring.

OBJECTIVE

To see whether use of paracetamol in late pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of asthma, wheezing and other atopic outcomes in the child at school age.

METHODS

In the population-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, we measured associations of paracetamol and aspirin use in late pregnancy (20-32 weeks) with asthma, hayfever, eczema (n = 8511) and wheezing (8381) in the offspring at 69-81 months, and with atopy (positive skin prick test to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, cat or grass, n = 6527) and blood total IgE (n = 5148) at 7 years. We used logistic and linear regression to analyse binary outcomes and log-transformed IgE, respectively, controlling for potential confounders.

RESULTS

Use of paracetamol, but not aspirin, in late pregnancy was positively associated with asthma (odds ratios (ORs), comparing children whose mothers took paracetamol 'sometimes' and 'most days/daily' with those whose mothers never took it, 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.41) and 1.62 (95% CI: 0.86-3.04), respectively; P trend = 0.0037), wheezing (ORs 1.20 (95% CI: 1.02-1.40) and 1.86 (95% CI: 0.98-3.55), respectively; P trend = 0.011), and total IgE (geometric mean ratios 1.14 (95% CI: 1.03-1.26) and 1.52 (95% CI: 0.98-2.38), respectively; P trend = 0.0034), but not hayfever, eczema or skin test positivity. The proportion of asthma attributable to paracetamol use in late pregnancy, assuming a causal relation, was 7%.

CONCLUSION

Paracetamol exposure in late gestation may cause asthma, wheezing and elevated IgE in children of school age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Sciences, Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine, King's College London, London, UK. seif.shaheen@kcl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15649261

Citation

Shaheen, S O., et al. "Prenatal Paracetamol Exposure and Risk of Asthma and Elevated Immunoglobulin E in Childhood." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 35, no. 1, 2005, pp. 18-25.
Shaheen SO, Newson RB, Henderson AJ, et al. Prenatal paracetamol exposure and risk of asthma and elevated immunoglobulin E in childhood. Clin Exp Allergy. 2005;35(1):18-25.
Shaheen, S. O., Newson, R. B., Henderson, A. J., Headley, J. E., Stratton, F. D., Jones, R. W., & Strachan, D. P. (2005). Prenatal paracetamol exposure and risk of asthma and elevated immunoglobulin E in childhood. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 35(1), 18-25.
Shaheen SO, et al. Prenatal Paracetamol Exposure and Risk of Asthma and Elevated Immunoglobulin E in Childhood. Clin Exp Allergy. 2005;35(1):18-25. PubMed PMID: 15649261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal paracetamol exposure and risk of asthma and elevated immunoglobulin E in childhood. AU - Shaheen,S O, AU - Newson,R B, AU - Henderson,A J, AU - Headley,J E, AU - Stratton,F D, AU - Jones,R W, AU - Strachan,D P, AU - ,, PY - 2005/1/15/pubmed PY - 2005/4/13/medline PY - 2005/1/15/entrez SP - 18 EP - 25 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin. Exp. Allergy VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: We recently found that paracetamol (acetaminophen) use in late pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of early wheezing in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To see whether use of paracetamol in late pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of asthma, wheezing and other atopic outcomes in the child at school age. METHODS: In the population-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, we measured associations of paracetamol and aspirin use in late pregnancy (20-32 weeks) with asthma, hayfever, eczema (n = 8511) and wheezing (8381) in the offspring at 69-81 months, and with atopy (positive skin prick test to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, cat or grass, n = 6527) and blood total IgE (n = 5148) at 7 years. We used logistic and linear regression to analyse binary outcomes and log-transformed IgE, respectively, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of paracetamol, but not aspirin, in late pregnancy was positively associated with asthma (odds ratios (ORs), comparing children whose mothers took paracetamol 'sometimes' and 'most days/daily' with those whose mothers never took it, 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.41) and 1.62 (95% CI: 0.86-3.04), respectively; P trend = 0.0037), wheezing (ORs 1.20 (95% CI: 1.02-1.40) and 1.86 (95% CI: 0.98-3.55), respectively; P trend = 0.011), and total IgE (geometric mean ratios 1.14 (95% CI: 1.03-1.26) and 1.52 (95% CI: 0.98-2.38), respectively; P trend = 0.0034), but not hayfever, eczema or skin test positivity. The proportion of asthma attributable to paracetamol use in late pregnancy, assuming a causal relation, was 7%. CONCLUSION: Paracetamol exposure in late gestation may cause asthma, wheezing and elevated IgE in children of school age. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15649261/Prenatal_paracetamol_exposure_and_risk_of_asthma_and_elevated_immunoglobulin_E_in_childhood_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2222.2005.02151.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -