Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Priming emotional facial expressions as evidenced by event-related brain potentials.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2005 Feb; 55(2):209-19.IJ

Abstract

As human faces are important social signals in everyday life, processing of facial affect has recently entered into the focus of neuroscientific research. In the present study, priming of faces showing the same emotional expression was measured with the help of event-related potentials (ERPs) in order to investigate the temporal characteristics of processing facial expressions. Participants classified portraits of unfamiliar persons according to their emotional expression (happy or angry). The portraits were either preceded by the face of a different person expressing the same affect (primed) or the opposite affect (unprimed). ERPs revealed both early and late priming effects, independent of stimulus valence. The early priming effect was characterized by attenuated frontal ERP amplitudes between 100 and 200 ms in response to primed targets. Its dipole sources were localised in the inferior occipitotemporal cortex, possibly related to the detection of expression-specific facial configurations, and in the insular cortex, considered to be involved in affective processes. The late priming effect, an enhancement of the late positive potential (LPP) following unprimed targets, may evidence greater relevance attributed to a change of emotional expressions. Our results (i) point to the view that a change of affect-related facial configuration can be detected very early during face perception and (ii) support previous findings on the amplitude of the late positive potential being rather related to arousal than to the specific valence of an emotional signal.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Humboldt University at Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 18, 12489 Berlin, Germany. katja.werheid@rz.hu-berlin.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15649552

Citation

Werheid, Katja, et al. "Priming Emotional Facial Expressions as Evidenced By Event-related Brain Potentials." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 55, no. 2, 2005, pp. 209-19.
Werheid K, Alpay G, Jentzsch I, et al. Priming emotional facial expressions as evidenced by event-related brain potentials. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;55(2):209-19.
Werheid, K., Alpay, G., Jentzsch, I., & Sommer, W. (2005). Priming emotional facial expressions as evidenced by event-related brain potentials. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 55(2), 209-19.
Werheid K, et al. Priming Emotional Facial Expressions as Evidenced By Event-related Brain Potentials. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;55(2):209-19. PubMed PMID: 15649552.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Priming emotional facial expressions as evidenced by event-related brain potentials. AU - Werheid,Katja, AU - Alpay,Gamze, AU - Jentzsch,Ines, AU - Sommer,Werner, PY - 2004/01/28/received PY - 2004/07/12/revised PY - 2004/07/26/accepted PY - 2005/1/15/pubmed PY - 2005/4/19/medline PY - 2005/1/15/entrez SP - 209 EP - 19 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - As human faces are important social signals in everyday life, processing of facial affect has recently entered into the focus of neuroscientific research. In the present study, priming of faces showing the same emotional expression was measured with the help of event-related potentials (ERPs) in order to investigate the temporal characteristics of processing facial expressions. Participants classified portraits of unfamiliar persons according to their emotional expression (happy or angry). The portraits were either preceded by the face of a different person expressing the same affect (primed) or the opposite affect (unprimed). ERPs revealed both early and late priming effects, independent of stimulus valence. The early priming effect was characterized by attenuated frontal ERP amplitudes between 100 and 200 ms in response to primed targets. Its dipole sources were localised in the inferior occipitotemporal cortex, possibly related to the detection of expression-specific facial configurations, and in the insular cortex, considered to be involved in affective processes. The late priming effect, an enhancement of the late positive potential (LPP) following unprimed targets, may evidence greater relevance attributed to a change of emotional expressions. Our results (i) point to the view that a change of affect-related facial configuration can be detected very early during face perception and (ii) support previous findings on the amplitude of the late positive potential being rather related to arousal than to the specific valence of an emotional signal. SN - 0167-8760 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15649552/Priming_emotional_facial_expressions_as_evidenced_by_event_related_brain_potentials_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(04)00164-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -