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Electrophysiological correlates of forming memories for faces, names, and face-name associations.
Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2005 Feb; 22(2):153-64.BR

Abstract

The ability to put a name to a face is a vital aspect of human interaction, but many people find this extremely difficult, especially after being introduced to someone for the first time. Creating enduring associations between arbitrary stimuli in this manner is also a prime example of what patients with amnesia find most difficult. To help develop a better understanding of this type of memory, we sought to obtain measures of the neural events responsible for successfully forming a new face-name association. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) extracted from high-density scalp EEG recordings in order to compare (1) memory for faces, (2) memory for names, and (3) memory for face-name associations. Each visual face appeared simultaneously with a unique spoken name. Signals observed 200-800 ms after the onset of face-name pairs predicted subsequent memory for faces, names, or face-name associations. Difference potentials observed as a function of subsequent memory performance were not identical for these three memory tests, nor were potentials predicting associative memory equivalent to the sum of potentials predicting item memory, suggesting that different neural events at the time of encoding are relevant for these distinct aspects of remembering people.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, 2029 Sheridan Road, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-2710, USA. guocy@mail.cnu.edu.cnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15653290

Citation

Guo, Chunyan, et al. "Electrophysiological Correlates of Forming Memories for Faces, Names, and Face-name Associations." Brain Research. Cognitive Brain Research, vol. 22, no. 2, 2005, pp. 153-64.
Guo C, Voss JL, Paller KA. Electrophysiological correlates of forming memories for faces, names, and face-name associations. Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2005;22(2):153-64.
Guo, C., Voss, J. L., & Paller, K. A. (2005). Electrophysiological correlates of forming memories for faces, names, and face-name associations. Brain Research. Cognitive Brain Research, 22(2), 153-64.
Guo C, Voss JL, Paller KA. Electrophysiological Correlates of Forming Memories for Faces, Names, and Face-name Associations. Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2005;22(2):153-64. PubMed PMID: 15653290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Electrophysiological correlates of forming memories for faces, names, and face-name associations. AU - Guo,Chunyan, AU - Voss,Joel L, AU - Paller,Ken A, PY - 2004/08/11/accepted PY - 2005/1/18/pubmed PY - 2005/4/19/medline PY - 2005/1/18/entrez SP - 153 EP - 64 JF - Brain research. Cognitive brain research JO - Brain Res Cogn Brain Res VL - 22 IS - 2 N2 - The ability to put a name to a face is a vital aspect of human interaction, but many people find this extremely difficult, especially after being introduced to someone for the first time. Creating enduring associations between arbitrary stimuli in this manner is also a prime example of what patients with amnesia find most difficult. To help develop a better understanding of this type of memory, we sought to obtain measures of the neural events responsible for successfully forming a new face-name association. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) extracted from high-density scalp EEG recordings in order to compare (1) memory for faces, (2) memory for names, and (3) memory for face-name associations. Each visual face appeared simultaneously with a unique spoken name. Signals observed 200-800 ms after the onset of face-name pairs predicted subsequent memory for faces, names, or face-name associations. Difference potentials observed as a function of subsequent memory performance were not identical for these three memory tests, nor were potentials predicting associative memory equivalent to the sum of potentials predicting item memory, suggesting that different neural events at the time of encoding are relevant for these distinct aspects of remembering people. SN - 0926-6410 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15653290/Electrophysiological_correlates_of_forming_memories_for_faces_names_and_face_name_associations_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0926-6410(04)00225-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -