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Is constipation associated with decreased physical activity in normally active subjects?
Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jan; 100(1):124-9.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The effectiveness of physical activity in the management of constipation remains controversial. We examined the associations among physical activity, constipation, and quality of life (QoL) in a population of employed adults to determine whether the risk of constipation is related to physical activity.

METHODS

A total of 1,069 employees (age range 24-77) of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Black Hills Health Care System were mailed validated questionnaires (response rate 72%), inquiring about bowel habits, QoL (SF 36), and physical activity (modified Baecke questionnaire). Constipation was defined using the Rome I criteria.

RESULTS

One hundred and forty (19.4%, 95% CI 16.2-22.4) employees reported constipation. The average total physical activity and all subscales of physical activity were not significantly different in subjects with and without constipation (all p > or = 0.2). Subjects with constipation had lower QoL scores than subjects without constipation, and physical activity was positively correlated with physical functioning and health perception.

CONCLUSION

Physical activity appears to be unrelated to the risk of constipation in employed adults, but higher physical activity was associated with improved QoL. Recommendations to increase physical activity may not alter symptoms of constipation but may improve overall well-being.

Authors+Show Affiliations

V.A. Medical Center and University of Utah, 30 N 1900 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15654791

Citation

Tuteja, Ashok K., et al. "Is Constipation Associated With Decreased Physical Activity in Normally Active Subjects?" The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 100, no. 1, 2005, pp. 124-9.
Tuteja AK, Talley NJ, Joos SK, et al. Is constipation associated with decreased physical activity in normally active subjects? Am J Gastroenterol. 2005;100(1):124-9.
Tuteja, A. K., Talley, N. J., Joos, S. K., Woehl, J. V., & Hickam, D. H. (2005). Is constipation associated with decreased physical activity in normally active subjects? The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 100(1), 124-9.
Tuteja AK, et al. Is Constipation Associated With Decreased Physical Activity in Normally Active Subjects. Am J Gastroenterol. 2005;100(1):124-9. PubMed PMID: 15654791.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is constipation associated with decreased physical activity in normally active subjects? AU - Tuteja,Ashok K, AU - Talley,Nicholas J, AU - Joos,Sandra K, AU - Woehl,James V, AU - Hickam,David H, PY - 2005/1/19/pubmed PY - 2005/2/16/medline PY - 2005/1/19/entrez SP - 124 EP - 9 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 100 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of physical activity in the management of constipation remains controversial. We examined the associations among physical activity, constipation, and quality of life (QoL) in a population of employed adults to determine whether the risk of constipation is related to physical activity. METHODS: A total of 1,069 employees (age range 24-77) of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Black Hills Health Care System were mailed validated questionnaires (response rate 72%), inquiring about bowel habits, QoL (SF 36), and physical activity (modified Baecke questionnaire). Constipation was defined using the Rome I criteria. RESULTS: One hundred and forty (19.4%, 95% CI 16.2-22.4) employees reported constipation. The average total physical activity and all subscales of physical activity were not significantly different in subjects with and without constipation (all p > or = 0.2). Subjects with constipation had lower QoL scores than subjects without constipation, and physical activity was positively correlated with physical functioning and health perception. CONCLUSION: Physical activity appears to be unrelated to the risk of constipation in employed adults, but higher physical activity was associated with improved QoL. Recommendations to increase physical activity may not alter symptoms of constipation but may improve overall well-being. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15654791/Is_constipation_associated_with_decreased_physical_activity_in_normally_active_subjects L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15654791 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -