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Severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus is detected in intestinal tissues of fatal cases.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jan; 100(1):169-76.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

A significant percentage of confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients experienced gastrointestinal symptoms, and the viral sequence was detectable in the stool of most patients. At present, the knowledge of the pathology of the digestive system in SARS patients is limited. Because a resurgence of the SARS epidemic is constantly possible, there is an urgent need to understand the involvement of the digestive system in this new disease.

METHODS

We performed seven SARS autopsies in which samples of alimentary tract and digestive glands were examined with routine pathology, electron microscopy (EM), in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

RESULTS

The main histopathological finding was atrophy of the mucosal lymphoid tissue. A few mucosal epithelial cells and lymphocytes in the intestine were positively stained for coronavirus with ISH. SARS-coronavirus (CoV)-like particles were found in the mucosal epithelial cells under EM and mild focal inflammation was detected in the alimentary tract. One patient who experienced severe diarrhea had pseudomembranous enteritis of the ileum. Fatty degeneration and central lobular necrosis were observed in the liver. No evidence of direct viral infection was found in the esophagus, the stomach, the salivary gland, the liver, or the pancreas.

CONCLUSIONS

In addition to the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract is another target of SARS-CoV infection, as the intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal lymphoid tissue are infected. The findings provide possible explanations for the gastrointestinal symptoms and the presence of virus in the stool of SARS patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15654797

Citation

Shi, Xueying, et al. "Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Associated Coronavirus Is Detected in Intestinal Tissues of Fatal Cases." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 100, no. 1, 2005, pp. 169-76.
Shi X, Gong E, Gao D, et al. Severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus is detected in intestinal tissues of fatal cases. Am J Gastroenterol. 2005;100(1):169-76.
Shi, X., Gong, E., Gao, D., Zhang, B., Zheng, J., Gao, Z., Zhong, Y., Zou, W., Wu, B., Fang, W., Liao, S., Wang, S., Xie, Z., Lu, M., Hou, L., Zhong, H., Shao, H., Li, N., Liu, C., ... Gu, J. (2005). Severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus is detected in intestinal tissues of fatal cases. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 100(1), 169-76.
Shi X, et al. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Associated Coronavirus Is Detected in Intestinal Tissues of Fatal Cases. Am J Gastroenterol. 2005;100(1):169-76. PubMed PMID: 15654797.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus is detected in intestinal tissues of fatal cases. AU - Shi,Xueying, AU - Gong,Encong, AU - Gao,Dongxia, AU - Zhang,Bo, AU - Zheng,Jie, AU - Gao,Zifen, AU - Zhong,Yanfeng, AU - Zou,Wanzhong, AU - Wu,Bingquan, AU - Fang,Weigang, AU - Liao,Songlin, AU - Wang,Shenglan, AU - Xie,Zhigang, AU - Lu,Min, AU - Hou,Lin, AU - Zhong,Haohao, AU - Shao,Hongquan, AU - Li,Ning, AU - Liu,Congrong, AU - Pei,Fei, AU - Yang,Jingping, AU - Wang,Yuping, AU - Han,Zhihui, AU - Shi,Xiaohong, AU - Zhang,Qianying, AU - You,Jiangfeng, AU - Zhu,Xiang, AU - Gu,Jiang, PY - 2005/1/19/pubmed PY - 2005/2/16/medline PY - 2005/1/19/entrez SP - 169 EP - 76 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 100 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: A significant percentage of confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients experienced gastrointestinal symptoms, and the viral sequence was detectable in the stool of most patients. At present, the knowledge of the pathology of the digestive system in SARS patients is limited. Because a resurgence of the SARS epidemic is constantly possible, there is an urgent need to understand the involvement of the digestive system in this new disease. METHODS: We performed seven SARS autopsies in which samples of alimentary tract and digestive glands were examined with routine pathology, electron microscopy (EM), in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS: The main histopathological finding was atrophy of the mucosal lymphoid tissue. A few mucosal epithelial cells and lymphocytes in the intestine were positively stained for coronavirus with ISH. SARS-coronavirus (CoV)-like particles were found in the mucosal epithelial cells under EM and mild focal inflammation was detected in the alimentary tract. One patient who experienced severe diarrhea had pseudomembranous enteritis of the ileum. Fatty degeneration and central lobular necrosis were observed in the liver. No evidence of direct viral infection was found in the esophagus, the stomach, the salivary gland, the liver, or the pancreas. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract is another target of SARS-CoV infection, as the intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal lymphoid tissue are infected. The findings provide possible explanations for the gastrointestinal symptoms and the presence of virus in the stool of SARS patients. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15654797/Severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_associated_coronavirus_is_detected_in_intestinal_tissues_of_fatal_cases_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15654797 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -