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Anticonvulsant activity of ginseng on seizures induced by chemical convulsants.
Epilepsia. 2005 Jan; 46(1):15-22.E

Abstract

PURPOSE

To test the anticonvulsant activity of three preparations of American ginseng: whole root extract, whole leaves/stems extract, and a partially purified extract that concentrates the Rb ginsenosides (Rb extract).

METHODS

One hour after treatment with normal saline, or one of the three ginseng preparations, seizures were induced in adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats with kainic acid (KA; 10 mg/kg), pilocarpine (300 mg/kg, preceded by methylscopolamine, 1 mg/kg, s.c.), or pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 50 mg/kg). Time to onset of seizure activity, duration of seizure activity for PTZ, seizure severity, and weight change for KA and pilocarpine were determined for each animal. The brains from animals who had received KA or pilocarpine were examined for severe neuronal stress, by using immunoreactivity for heat-shock protein (HSP)72.

RESULTS

The Rb extract had a dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect in all three models of chemically induced seizures: increasing the latency to the seizures; decreasing the seizure score, weight loss, and subsequent neuronal damage after pilocarpine; and shortening the seizure duration and reducing mortality after PTZ. The Rb extract also significantly reduced the effects of KA, including completely blocking behavioral seizures. The root preparation increased the mortality rate after administration of pilocarpine, but had no other significant effects. The leaves/stems preparation, at 120 mg/kg, reduced the weight loss after pilocarpine, but had no other significant effects.

CONCLUSIONS

Ginseng extract made from either the root or leaves/stems is ineffective against chemically induced seizures. A partial purification of the whole extract that concentrates the Rb1 and Rb3 ginsenosides has significant anticonvulsant properties.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15660764

Citation

Lian, Xiao-Yuan, et al. "Anticonvulsant Activity of Ginseng On Seizures Induced By Chemical Convulsants." Epilepsia, vol. 46, no. 1, 2005, pp. 15-22.
Lian XY, Zhang ZZ, Stringer JL. Anticonvulsant activity of ginseng on seizures induced by chemical convulsants. Epilepsia. 2005;46(1):15-22.
Lian, X. Y., Zhang, Z. Z., & Stringer, J. L. (2005). Anticonvulsant activity of ginseng on seizures induced by chemical convulsants. Epilepsia, 46(1), 15-22.
Lian XY, Zhang ZZ, Stringer JL. Anticonvulsant Activity of Ginseng On Seizures Induced By Chemical Convulsants. Epilepsia. 2005;46(1):15-22. PubMed PMID: 15660764.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anticonvulsant activity of ginseng on seizures induced by chemical convulsants. AU - Lian,Xiao-Yuan, AU - Zhang,Zhi-Zhen, AU - Stringer,Janet L, PY - 2005/1/22/pubmed PY - 2005/3/4/medline PY - 2005/1/22/entrez SP - 15 EP - 22 JF - Epilepsia JO - Epilepsia VL - 46 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To test the anticonvulsant activity of three preparations of American ginseng: whole root extract, whole leaves/stems extract, and a partially purified extract that concentrates the Rb ginsenosides (Rb extract). METHODS: One hour after treatment with normal saline, or one of the three ginseng preparations, seizures were induced in adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats with kainic acid (KA; 10 mg/kg), pilocarpine (300 mg/kg, preceded by methylscopolamine, 1 mg/kg, s.c.), or pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 50 mg/kg). Time to onset of seizure activity, duration of seizure activity for PTZ, seizure severity, and weight change for KA and pilocarpine were determined for each animal. The brains from animals who had received KA or pilocarpine were examined for severe neuronal stress, by using immunoreactivity for heat-shock protein (HSP)72. RESULTS: The Rb extract had a dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect in all three models of chemically induced seizures: increasing the latency to the seizures; decreasing the seizure score, weight loss, and subsequent neuronal damage after pilocarpine; and shortening the seizure duration and reducing mortality after PTZ. The Rb extract also significantly reduced the effects of KA, including completely blocking behavioral seizures. The root preparation increased the mortality rate after administration of pilocarpine, but had no other significant effects. The leaves/stems preparation, at 120 mg/kg, reduced the weight loss after pilocarpine, but had no other significant effects. CONCLUSIONS: Ginseng extract made from either the root or leaves/stems is ineffective against chemically induced seizures. A partial purification of the whole extract that concentrates the Rb1 and Rb3 ginsenosides has significant anticonvulsant properties. SN - 0013-9580 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15660764/Anticonvulsant_activity_of_ginseng_on_seizures_induced_by_chemical_convulsants_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -