Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Staphylococcus aureus re-colonization in atopic dermatitis: beyond the skin.
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2005 Jan; 30(1):10-3.CE

Abstract

Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are often heavily colonized by Staphylococcus aureus, which adversely affects eczema severity. Strategies to control S. aureus in AD include antibiotic and or antiseptics. However long-term efficacy is unclear. In this study we consider extra-cutaneous factors that may cause S. aureus re-colonization in adult AD. Twenty-one patients with AD were recruited and were assessed for: duration of AD, use of topical or oral antibiotic within the preceding 3 months, the number of hospital admissions during the preceding year and current treatment. The types of topical treatments used, vehicle, container and the expiry dates were also recorded. The severity of AD was assessed by SCORAD index. Microbiological assessment for S. aureus carriage from affected skin, anterior nares, emollient and topical steroid was undertaken using culture, Staphaurex test and antibiotic resistance. Of the patients 86% had S. aureus colonization. The median SCORAD score were greater in those colonized with S. aureus (P = 0.02) and those with contaminated treatments (P = 0.05). Prior antibiotic treatment, prior hospital admission and nasal carriage did not influence the median SCORAD. Three extra-cutaneous mechanisms by which S. aureus can re-colonize the skin were identified: antibiotic resistance, nasal carriage and treatment contamination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15663492

Citation

Gilani, S J K., et al. "Staphylococcus Aureus Re-colonization in Atopic Dermatitis: Beyond the Skin." Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, vol. 30, no. 1, 2005, pp. 10-3.
Gilani SJ, Gonzalez M, Hussain I, et al. Staphylococcus aureus re-colonization in atopic dermatitis: beyond the skin. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2005;30(1):10-3.
Gilani, S. J., Gonzalez, M., Hussain, I., Finlay, A. Y., & Patel, G. K. (2005). Staphylococcus aureus re-colonization in atopic dermatitis: beyond the skin. Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, 30(1), 10-3.
Gilani SJ, et al. Staphylococcus Aureus Re-colonization in Atopic Dermatitis: Beyond the Skin. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2005;30(1):10-3. PubMed PMID: 15663492.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Staphylococcus aureus re-colonization in atopic dermatitis: beyond the skin. AU - Gilani,S J K, AU - Gonzalez,M, AU - Hussain,I, AU - Finlay,A Y, AU - Patel,G K, PY - 2005/1/25/pubmed PY - 2005/4/13/medline PY - 2005/1/25/entrez SP - 10 EP - 3 JF - Clinical and experimental dermatology JO - Clin Exp Dermatol VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are often heavily colonized by Staphylococcus aureus, which adversely affects eczema severity. Strategies to control S. aureus in AD include antibiotic and or antiseptics. However long-term efficacy is unclear. In this study we consider extra-cutaneous factors that may cause S. aureus re-colonization in adult AD. Twenty-one patients with AD were recruited and were assessed for: duration of AD, use of topical or oral antibiotic within the preceding 3 months, the number of hospital admissions during the preceding year and current treatment. The types of topical treatments used, vehicle, container and the expiry dates were also recorded. The severity of AD was assessed by SCORAD index. Microbiological assessment for S. aureus carriage from affected skin, anterior nares, emollient and topical steroid was undertaken using culture, Staphaurex test and antibiotic resistance. Of the patients 86% had S. aureus colonization. The median SCORAD score were greater in those colonized with S. aureus (P = 0.02) and those with contaminated treatments (P = 0.05). Prior antibiotic treatment, prior hospital admission and nasal carriage did not influence the median SCORAD. Three extra-cutaneous mechanisms by which S. aureus can re-colonize the skin were identified: antibiotic resistance, nasal carriage and treatment contamination. SN - 0307-6938 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15663492/Staphylococcus_aureus_re_colonization_in_atopic_dermatitis:_beyond_the_skin_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -