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Factors affecting psychophysical tuning curves for hearing-impaired subjects with high-frequency dead regions.
Hear Res. 2005 Feb; 200(1-2):115-31.HR

Abstract

A dead region (DR) is a region of the cochlea where there are no functioning inner hair cells and/or neurons. DRs can be detected using the threshold-equalizing-noise (TEN) test, but psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) are sometimes used to give a more precise estimate of the edge frequency of a DR; a shifted tip of the PTC indicates a DR. We show here that the shapes of PTCs for hearing-impaired subjects can be influenced by the detection of beats and simple difference tones (SDTs). As a result, PTCs can have tips at f(s), even when f(s) falls in a DR. PTCs were measured for subjects with mild to moderate low-frequency and severe high-frequency hearing loss using sinusoidal and narrowband noise maskers (80-, 160-, 320-Hz wide): (1) in quiet; (2) in the presence of additional lowpass filtered noise (LF noise) designed to mask SDTs; (3) in the presence of a pair of low-frequency tones designed to interfere with the detection of beats (MDI tones). In condition (1), the PTCs were often W-shaped, with a sharp tip at f(s). This occurred less for the wider noise bandwidths. For subjects with good low-frequency hearing, the LF noise often reduced or eliminated the tip at f(s), suggesting that this tip was partly caused by detection of SDTs. For the sinusoidal and 80-Hz wide noise maskers, the addition of the MDI tones reduced the masker level required for threshold for masker frequencies adjacent to f(s), for nearly all subjects, suggesting a strong influence of beat detection. To minimize the influence of beats, we recommend using noise maskers with a bandwidth of 160 or (preferably) 320 Hz. In cases of near-normal hearing at low frequencies, we recommend using an additional LF noise to mask SDTs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK. kk278@cam.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15668043

Citation

Kluk, Karolina, and Brian C J. Moore. "Factors Affecting Psychophysical Tuning Curves for Hearing-impaired Subjects With High-frequency Dead Regions." Hearing Research, vol. 200, no. 1-2, 2005, pp. 115-31.
Kluk K, Moore BC. Factors affecting psychophysical tuning curves for hearing-impaired subjects with high-frequency dead regions. Hear Res. 2005;200(1-2):115-31.
Kluk, K., & Moore, B. C. (2005). Factors affecting psychophysical tuning curves for hearing-impaired subjects with high-frequency dead regions. Hearing Research, 200(1-2), 115-31.
Kluk K, Moore BC. Factors Affecting Psychophysical Tuning Curves for Hearing-impaired Subjects With High-frequency Dead Regions. Hear Res. 2005;200(1-2):115-31. PubMed PMID: 15668043.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors affecting psychophysical tuning curves for hearing-impaired subjects with high-frequency dead regions. AU - Kluk,Karolina, AU - Moore,Brian C J, PY - 2004/07/09/received PY - 2004/09/08/accepted PY - 2005/1/26/pubmed PY - 2005/7/12/medline PY - 2005/1/26/entrez SP - 115 EP - 31 JF - Hearing research JO - Hear Res VL - 200 IS - 1-2 N2 - A dead region (DR) is a region of the cochlea where there are no functioning inner hair cells and/or neurons. DRs can be detected using the threshold-equalizing-noise (TEN) test, but psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) are sometimes used to give a more precise estimate of the edge frequency of a DR; a shifted tip of the PTC indicates a DR. We show here that the shapes of PTCs for hearing-impaired subjects can be influenced by the detection of beats and simple difference tones (SDTs). As a result, PTCs can have tips at f(s), even when f(s) falls in a DR. PTCs were measured for subjects with mild to moderate low-frequency and severe high-frequency hearing loss using sinusoidal and narrowband noise maskers (80-, 160-, 320-Hz wide): (1) in quiet; (2) in the presence of additional lowpass filtered noise (LF noise) designed to mask SDTs; (3) in the presence of a pair of low-frequency tones designed to interfere with the detection of beats (MDI tones). In condition (1), the PTCs were often W-shaped, with a sharp tip at f(s). This occurred less for the wider noise bandwidths. For subjects with good low-frequency hearing, the LF noise often reduced or eliminated the tip at f(s), suggesting that this tip was partly caused by detection of SDTs. For the sinusoidal and 80-Hz wide noise maskers, the addition of the MDI tones reduced the masker level required for threshold for masker frequencies adjacent to f(s), for nearly all subjects, suggesting a strong influence of beat detection. To minimize the influence of beats, we recommend using noise maskers with a bandwidth of 160 or (preferably) 320 Hz. In cases of near-normal hearing at low frequencies, we recommend using an additional LF noise to mask SDTs. SN - 0378-5955 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15668043/Factors_affecting_psychophysical_tuning_curves_for_hearing_impaired_subjects_with_high_frequency_dead_regions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-5955(04)00307-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -