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Parental control over feeding and children's fruit and vegetable intake: how are they related?
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Feb; 105(2):227-32.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To replicate the finding of a negative association between parental control and fruit and vegetable consumption in girls. To extend the investigation to boys and examine sex differences. To test the hypothesis that children's food neophobia explains this association.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

MEASURES

The questionnaire included items assessing parents' and children's fruit and vegetable intake, the Parental Control Index, and the Child Food Neophobia Scale.

SUBJECTS

Parents of 564 2- to 6-year-old children, recruited from 22 London nursery schools.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Relationships between continuous variables were examined with Pearson product moment correlation coefficients. Sex differences were tested using independent sample t tests, and sex differences in correlations were assessed from their 95% confidence intervals. Parental control and children's food neophobia were entered into a hierarchical multiple regression to test the hypothesis that neophobia explains the association between parental control and children's fruit and vegetable intake.

RESULTS

We replicated the finding that parental control was correlated with children's fruit and vegetable consumption and found no significant sex differences. Parental fruit and vegetable consumption and children's food neophobia were also strong predictors of children's fruit and vegetable consumption, and both were associated with parental control, suggesting that they might explain the association between control and intake. Controlling for children's food neophobia and parental intake reduced the association of parental control with children's fruit and vegetable intake to nonsignificance.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings emphasize the importance of systematic research about associations between parental feeding styles and children's dietary habits so that dietetics professionals can give parents sound advice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 2-16 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, England. j.wardle@ucl.ac.uk <j.wardle@ucl.ac.uk>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15668680

Citation

Wardle, Jane, et al. "Parental Control Over Feeding and Children's Fruit and Vegetable Intake: How Are They Related?" Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 105, no. 2, 2005, pp. 227-32.
Wardle J, Carnell S, Cooke L. Parental control over feeding and children's fruit and vegetable intake: how are they related? J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(2):227-32.
Wardle, J., Carnell, S., & Cooke, L. (2005). Parental control over feeding and children's fruit and vegetable intake: how are they related? Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 105(2), 227-32.
Wardle J, Carnell S, Cooke L. Parental Control Over Feeding and Children's Fruit and Vegetable Intake: How Are They Related. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(2):227-32. PubMed PMID: 15668680.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental control over feeding and children's fruit and vegetable intake: how are they related? AU - Wardle,Jane, AU - Carnell,Susan, AU - Cooke,Lucy, PY - 2005/1/26/pubmed PY - 2005/3/9/medline PY - 2005/1/26/entrez SP - 227 EP - 32 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 105 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To replicate the finding of a negative association between parental control and fruit and vegetable consumption in girls. To extend the investigation to boys and examine sex differences. To test the hypothesis that children's food neophobia explains this association. DESIGN: Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. MEASURES: The questionnaire included items assessing parents' and children's fruit and vegetable intake, the Parental Control Index, and the Child Food Neophobia Scale. SUBJECTS: Parents of 564 2- to 6-year-old children, recruited from 22 London nursery schools. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Relationships between continuous variables were examined with Pearson product moment correlation coefficients. Sex differences were tested using independent sample t tests, and sex differences in correlations were assessed from their 95% confidence intervals. Parental control and children's food neophobia were entered into a hierarchical multiple regression to test the hypothesis that neophobia explains the association between parental control and children's fruit and vegetable intake. RESULTS: We replicated the finding that parental control was correlated with children's fruit and vegetable consumption and found no significant sex differences. Parental fruit and vegetable consumption and children's food neophobia were also strong predictors of children's fruit and vegetable consumption, and both were associated with parental control, suggesting that they might explain the association between control and intake. Controlling for children's food neophobia and parental intake reduced the association of parental control with children's fruit and vegetable intake to nonsignificance. CONCLUSIONS: These findings emphasize the importance of systematic research about associations between parental feeding styles and children's dietary habits so that dietetics professionals can give parents sound advice. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15668680/Parental_control_over_feeding_and_children's_fruit_and_vegetable_intake:_how_are_they_related L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822304017122 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -