Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Short-term carnitine supplementation does not augment LCPomega3 status of vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians.
J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Feb; 24(1):58-64.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (LCPomega3) synthesis, notably that of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), from the precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) proceeds with difficulty. We investigated whether carnitine supplementation augments the LCPomega3 status of apparently healthy vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians, who are expected to have low carnitine status.

METHODS

Group A (n = 11) took 990 mg/day l-carnitine from weeks 1-4, and 990 mg/day l-carnitine + 4 mL/day linseed oil from weeks 5-8. Group B (n = 9) took 4 mL/day linseed oil from weeks 1-4, and 4 mL/day linseed oil + 990 mg/day l-carnitine from weeks 5-8. Fatty acid compositions of red blood cells, platelets, plasma cholesterol esters and plasma triglycerides were measured in the fasting state at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks.

RESULTS

Carnitine supplementation increased plasma free and total carnitine concentrations with 30 and 25%, respectively, but did not affect eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and DHA contents of any of the investigated compartments. EPA and DHA changes were negatively related to initial carnitine status.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that carnitine is not an important limiting factor, if any, for LCPomega3 synthesis in vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians. This conclusion is also likely to apply to omnivores. The most efficient means to augment EPA and particularly DHA status remains consumption of LCPomega3 from e.g. fish or supplements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital Groningen, CMC-V, room Y1.165, PO Box 30.001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, THE NETHERLANDS. m.r.fokkema@path.azg.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15670986

Citation

Fokkema, M Rebecca, et al. "Short-term Carnitine Supplementation Does Not Augment LCPomega3 Status of Vegans and Lacto-ovo-vegetarians." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 24, no. 1, 2005, pp. 58-64.
Fokkema MR, van Rieke HM, Bauermann OJ, et al. Short-term carnitine supplementation does not augment LCPomega3 status of vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005;24(1):58-64.
Fokkema, M. R., van Rieke, H. M., Bauermann, O. J., Smit, E. N., & Muskiet, F. A. (2005). Short-term carnitine supplementation does not augment LCPomega3 status of vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 24(1), 58-64.
Fokkema MR, et al. Short-term Carnitine Supplementation Does Not Augment LCPomega3 Status of Vegans and Lacto-ovo-vegetarians. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005;24(1):58-64. PubMed PMID: 15670986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short-term carnitine supplementation does not augment LCPomega3 status of vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians. AU - Fokkema,M Rebecca, AU - van Rieke,H M, AU - Bauermann,O J, AU - Smit,E N, AU - Muskiet,F A J, PY - 2005/1/27/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2005/1/27/entrez SP - 58 EP - 64 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (LCPomega3) synthesis, notably that of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), from the precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) proceeds with difficulty. We investigated whether carnitine supplementation augments the LCPomega3 status of apparently healthy vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians, who are expected to have low carnitine status. METHODS: Group A (n = 11) took 990 mg/day l-carnitine from weeks 1-4, and 990 mg/day l-carnitine + 4 mL/day linseed oil from weeks 5-8. Group B (n = 9) took 4 mL/day linseed oil from weeks 1-4, and 4 mL/day linseed oil + 990 mg/day l-carnitine from weeks 5-8. Fatty acid compositions of red blood cells, platelets, plasma cholesterol esters and plasma triglycerides were measured in the fasting state at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks. RESULTS: Carnitine supplementation increased plasma free and total carnitine concentrations with 30 and 25%, respectively, but did not affect eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and DHA contents of any of the investigated compartments. EPA and DHA changes were negatively related to initial carnitine status. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that carnitine is not an important limiting factor, if any, for LCPomega3 synthesis in vegans and lacto-ovo-vegetarians. This conclusion is also likely to apply to omnivores. The most efficient means to augment EPA and particularly DHA status remains consumption of LCPomega3 from e.g. fish or supplements. SN - 0731-5724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15670986/Short_term_carnitine_supplementation_does_not_augment_LCPomega3_status_of_vegans_and_lacto_ovo_vegetarians_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2005.10719444 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -