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Glaucomatous visual field progression with frequency-doubling technology and standard automated perimetry in a longitudinal prospective study.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2005 Feb; 46(2):547-54.IO

Abstract

PURPOSE

To compare frequency-doubling technology (FDT) perimetry with standard automated perimetry (SAP) for detecting glaucomatous visual field progression in a longitudinal prospective study.

METHODS

One eye of patients with open-angle glaucoma was tested every 6 months with both FDT and SAP. A minimum of 6 examinations with each perimetric technique was required for inclusion. Visual field progression was determined by two methods: glaucoma change probability (GCP) analysis and linear regression analysis (LRA). For GCP, several criteria for progression were used. The number of locations required to classify progression with FDT compared with SAP, respectively, was 1:2 (least conservative), 1:3, 2:3, 2:4, 2:6, 2:7, 3:6, 3:7, and 3:10 (most conservative). The number of consecutive examinations required to confirm progression was 2-of-3, 2-of-2, and 3-of-3. For LRA, the progression criterion was any significant decline in mean threshold sensitivity over time in each of the following three visual field subdivisions: (1) all test locations, (2) locations in the central 10 degrees and the superior and inferior hemifields, and (3) locations in each quadrant. Using these criteria, the proportion of patients classified as showing progression with each perimetric technique was calculated and, in the case of progression with both, the differences in time to progression were determined.

RESULTS

Sixty-five patients were followed for a median of 3.5 years (median number of examinations, 9). For the least conservative GCP criterion, 32 (49%) patients were found to have progressing visual fields with FDT and 32 (49%) patients with SAP. Only 16 (25%) patients showed progression with both methods, and in most of those patients, FDT identified progression before SAP (median, 12 months earlier). The majority of GCP progression criteria (15/27), classified more patients as showing progression with FDT than with SAP. Contrary to this, more patients showed progression with SAP than FDT, when analysed with LRA; e.g., using quadrant LRA 20 (31%) patients showed progression with FDT, 23 (35%) with SAP, and only 10 (15%) with both.

CONCLUSIONS

FDT perimetry detected glaucomatous visual field progression. However, the proportion of patients who showed progression with both FDT and SAP was small, possibly indicating that the two techniques identify different subgroups of patients. Using GCP, more patients showed progression with FDT than with SAP, yet the opposite occurred using LRA. As there is no independent qualifier of progression, FDT and SAP progression rates vary depending on the method of analysis and the criterion used.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15671281

Citation

Haymes, Sharon A., et al. "Glaucomatous Visual Field Progression With Frequency-doubling Technology and Standard Automated Perimetry in a Longitudinal Prospective Study." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 46, no. 2, 2005, pp. 547-54.
Haymes SA, Hutchison DM, McCormick TA, et al. Glaucomatous visual field progression with frequency-doubling technology and standard automated perimetry in a longitudinal prospective study. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2005;46(2):547-54.
Haymes, S. A., Hutchison, D. M., McCormick, T. A., Varma, D. K., Nicolela, M. T., LeBlanc, R. P., & Chauhan, B. C. (2005). Glaucomatous visual field progression with frequency-doubling technology and standard automated perimetry in a longitudinal prospective study. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 46(2), 547-54.
Haymes SA, et al. Glaucomatous Visual Field Progression With Frequency-doubling Technology and Standard Automated Perimetry in a Longitudinal Prospective Study. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2005;46(2):547-54. PubMed PMID: 15671281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glaucomatous visual field progression with frequency-doubling technology and standard automated perimetry in a longitudinal prospective study. AU - Haymes,Sharon A, AU - Hutchison,Donna M, AU - McCormick,Terry A, AU - Varma,Devesh K, AU - Nicolela,Marcelo T, AU - LeBlanc,Raymond P, AU - Chauhan,Balwantray C, PY - 2005/1/27/pubmed PY - 2005/3/12/medline PY - 2005/1/27/entrez SP - 547 EP - 54 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci VL - 46 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: To compare frequency-doubling technology (FDT) perimetry with standard automated perimetry (SAP) for detecting glaucomatous visual field progression in a longitudinal prospective study. METHODS: One eye of patients with open-angle glaucoma was tested every 6 months with both FDT and SAP. A minimum of 6 examinations with each perimetric technique was required for inclusion. Visual field progression was determined by two methods: glaucoma change probability (GCP) analysis and linear regression analysis (LRA). For GCP, several criteria for progression were used. The number of locations required to classify progression with FDT compared with SAP, respectively, was 1:2 (least conservative), 1:3, 2:3, 2:4, 2:6, 2:7, 3:6, 3:7, and 3:10 (most conservative). The number of consecutive examinations required to confirm progression was 2-of-3, 2-of-2, and 3-of-3. For LRA, the progression criterion was any significant decline in mean threshold sensitivity over time in each of the following three visual field subdivisions: (1) all test locations, (2) locations in the central 10 degrees and the superior and inferior hemifields, and (3) locations in each quadrant. Using these criteria, the proportion of patients classified as showing progression with each perimetric technique was calculated and, in the case of progression with both, the differences in time to progression were determined. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients were followed for a median of 3.5 years (median number of examinations, 9). For the least conservative GCP criterion, 32 (49%) patients were found to have progressing visual fields with FDT and 32 (49%) patients with SAP. Only 16 (25%) patients showed progression with both methods, and in most of those patients, FDT identified progression before SAP (median, 12 months earlier). The majority of GCP progression criteria (15/27), classified more patients as showing progression with FDT than with SAP. Contrary to this, more patients showed progression with SAP than FDT, when analysed with LRA; e.g., using quadrant LRA 20 (31%) patients showed progression with FDT, 23 (35%) with SAP, and only 10 (15%) with both. CONCLUSIONS: FDT perimetry detected glaucomatous visual field progression. However, the proportion of patients who showed progression with both FDT and SAP was small, possibly indicating that the two techniques identify different subgroups of patients. Using GCP, more patients showed progression with FDT than with SAP, yet the opposite occurred using LRA. As there is no independent qualifier of progression, FDT and SAP progression rates vary depending on the method of analysis and the criterion used. SN - 0146-0404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15671281/Glaucomatous_visual_field_progression_with_frequency_doubling_technology_and_standard_automated_perimetry_in_a_longitudinal_prospective_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -