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Psychosocial stress-induced activation of salivary alpha-amylase: an indicator of sympathetic activity?
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Dec; 1032:258-63.AN

Abstract

Assessment of sympathoadrenal medullary system (SAM) activity is only possible to date via measurement of catecholamines in blood plasma or via electrophysiological methods. Both ways of measurement are restricted to endocrinological or psychophysiological laboratories, as both require either immediate freezing of blood samples or complex recording devices. Efforts have therefore been undertaken to find a method comparable to salivary cortisol measurements, in which noninvasive samples can be taken at any place and stored at room temperature for sufficient time before later analysis in the laboratory. Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) is a candidate that may prove useful in this context. We show here that sAA activity is increased by acute psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test) and that increases in sAA correlate with increases in norepinephrine. We further report that sAA exhibits a stable circadian pattern that mirrors that of salivary cortisol. In conclusion, the current data show that salivary alpha-amylase may serve as an easy-to-use index for SAM activity. However, some questions remain to be answered; for example, what impact does salivary flow rate exert on stress-induced sAA activity?

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biopsychology, Technical University of Dresden, Zellescher Weg 17, D-01069 Dresden, Germany. nicolas.rohleder@biopsych.tu-dresden.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15677423

Citation

Rohleder, Nicolas, et al. "Psychosocial Stress-induced Activation of Salivary Alpha-amylase: an Indicator of Sympathetic Activity?" Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1032, 2004, pp. 258-63.
Rohleder N, Nater UM, Wolf JM, et al. Psychosocial stress-induced activation of salivary alpha-amylase: an indicator of sympathetic activity? Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004;1032:258-63.
Rohleder, N., Nater, U. M., Wolf, J. M., Ehlert, U., & Kirschbaum, C. (2004). Psychosocial stress-induced activation of salivary alpha-amylase: an indicator of sympathetic activity? Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1032, 258-63.
Rohleder N, et al. Psychosocial Stress-induced Activation of Salivary Alpha-amylase: an Indicator of Sympathetic Activity. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004;1032:258-63. PubMed PMID: 15677423.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychosocial stress-induced activation of salivary alpha-amylase: an indicator of sympathetic activity? AU - Rohleder,Nicolas, AU - Nater,Urs M, AU - Wolf,Jutta M, AU - Ehlert,Ulrike, AU - Kirschbaum,Clemens, PY - 2005/1/29/pubmed PY - 2005/4/20/medline PY - 2005/1/29/entrez SP - 258 EP - 63 JF - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences JO - Ann N Y Acad Sci VL - 1032 N2 - Assessment of sympathoadrenal medullary system (SAM) activity is only possible to date via measurement of catecholamines in blood plasma or via electrophysiological methods. Both ways of measurement are restricted to endocrinological or psychophysiological laboratories, as both require either immediate freezing of blood samples or complex recording devices. Efforts have therefore been undertaken to find a method comparable to salivary cortisol measurements, in which noninvasive samples can be taken at any place and stored at room temperature for sufficient time before later analysis in the laboratory. Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) is a candidate that may prove useful in this context. We show here that sAA activity is increased by acute psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test) and that increases in sAA correlate with increases in norepinephrine. We further report that sAA exhibits a stable circadian pattern that mirrors that of salivary cortisol. In conclusion, the current data show that salivary alpha-amylase may serve as an easy-to-use index for SAM activity. However, some questions remain to be answered; for example, what impact does salivary flow rate exert on stress-induced sAA activity? SN - 0077-8923 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15677423/Psychosocial_stress_induced_activation_of_salivary_alpha_amylase:_an_indicator_of_sympathetic_activity L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0077-8923&date=2004&volume=1032&spage=258 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -